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Signed Battle of Britain Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman. - IvanBerryman.com

DHM2080.  Head on Attack by Robert Taylor. <p> On October 12, 1940, No. 603 Squadron, reduced to only eight aircraft, took on a large formation of Me109s attacking head on. Robert Taylors vivid portrayal shows Scott-Maldens Spitfire moments after knocking down an Me109 in the encounter, both he and his wingman coming through unscathed.<p><b>Sold out at the publisher - last 7 copies available.  These have a very small bend in the bottom right hand corner of the border.  It does not affect the image or even the inner coloured border, only the outer white border.</b><b><p>Signed by Air Vice-Marshal David Scott-Malden (deceased). <p> Signed limited edition of 1250 prints.  <p>Paper size 24 inches x 20 inches (61cm x 51cm)
B0352. 41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman. <p> Spitfires of No.41 Sqn during the Battle of Britain.  The lead aircraft is EB-J, flown by Sqn Ldr Maurice Brown. <b><p>Signed by Squadron Leader Maurice P Brown (deceased). <p>Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.  <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)

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  Website Price: £ 195.00  

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Signed Battle of Britain Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.

PCK1614. Signed Battle of Britain Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2080. Head on Attack by Robert Taylor.

On October 12, 1940, No. 603 Squadron, reduced to only eight aircraft, took on a large formation of Me109s attacking head on. Robert Taylors vivid portrayal shows Scott-Maldens Spitfire moments after knocking down an Me109 in the encounter, both he and his wingman coming through unscathed.

Sold out at the publisher - last 7 copies available. These have a very small bend in the bottom right hand corner of the border. It does not affect the image or even the inner coloured border, only the outer white border.

Signed by Air Vice-Marshal David Scott-Malden (deceased).

Signed limited edition of 1250 prints.

Paper size 24 inches x 20 inches (61cm x 51cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0352. 41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman.

Spitfires of No.41 Sqn during the Battle of Britain. The lead aircraft is EB-J, flown by Sqn Ldr Maurice Brown.

Signed by Squadron Leader Maurice P Brown (deceased).

Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)


Website Price: £ 195.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £365.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £170




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Air Vice-Marshal David Scott-Malden (deceased)
*Signature Value : £65 (matted)

Born 26th December 1919, at Portslade, Sussex , David Scott-Malden became a Pilot Officer in October 1939. After training in the Cambridge University Air Squadron, Scott-Malden was selected for an Army Co-Operation course as a pilot officer. He was thrilled when in late May 1940 the chief instructor announced that he had "a severe disappointment" to communicate: "Gentlemen," he said, "you are to be transferred immediately to fighters". Scott-Malden joined No 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron at Hornchurch, Essex in early October 1940 as a replacement Spitfire pilot during the early stage of the Battle of Britain over the South-East. The squadron had been much depleted by losses that summer as was only too apparent in an action over Kent on October 12th. "Eight aircraft were directed into a large gaggle of Me109 fighters, we split up individually and passed head-on through the enemy formation. There was a sense of shock as a distant series of silhouettes suddenly became rough metal with grey-green paint and yellow noses, passing head-on on either side. At the far end I had a few minutes dog fight with the last 109, scoring hits leaving a trail of black smoke. Then we were alone at 20,000 feet, the German gliding down with an engine which coughed and barely turned over, I with very little ammunition and very little petrol. He glided towards the Channel. I looked for an airfield before my petrol ran out. Strangely, I felt inclined to wave to him as I left. But then I was only 20". It was Scott-Malden who would go onto many other victories with five confirmed and as many as seven probables. In June 1940 he was posted to fly Spitfires with No 611 (West Lancashire) Squadron at Digby, Lincolnshire before being transferred to No 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron at Hornchurch in early October. In the New Year of 1941 Scott-Malden flew offensive sweeps with 603 over northern France. He was promoted to flight commander and in September received command of No 54 Squadron. Bearing the initials "S-M" below the cockpit and the legend "Bahrain", Scott-Maldens Spitfire W3632 - built at the Supermarine factory at Woolston, Hampshire - was a gift from the people of Bahrain, who had raised 15,000 to purchase the Spitfire. Moving in November to headquarters No 14 Group in Scotland, Scott-Malden had the task of helping to bring to operational readiness the first Free Norwegian fighter squadrons, with pilots who had escaped from Norway. When they were ready Scott-Malden was appointed, in March 1942, to command the Norwegian Fighter Wing of three squadrons at North Weald in Essex. In the summer, the wing built a magnificent reputation and covered itself in glory during the disastrous Dieppe raid of August 20. Operating from the Kent coastal airfield at Manston, Scott-Malden led Nos 242, 331 and 332 squadrons in three separate sorties on the day, seeking, against great odds, to protect the mostly Canadian troops as they attempted to land and then to withdraw. Scott-Malden was awarded a DSO in 1942 and was also decorated by King Haakon of Norway with the Norwegian War Cross, lunching with the King afterwards at Claridges. In New Year 1944, in preparation During the run for the Normandy invasion, in 1944 Scott Malden joined a mobile group control unit on Goodwood racecourse. After D-Day June 6, the unit moved to Normandy with the roll to control fighter support. During the summer of 1944 Scott-Malden was promoted acting group captain and given command of No 125, a Spitfire wing covering the Allied forces as they advanced through North-West Europe from nine different points. Scott-Malden took a permanent commission witht he RAF and took a number staff and command appointments, one of which was to assist with plans for the Suez campaign of 1956. Scott-Malden final tally of victories stood at 3 confirmed destroyed with two shared, five probables and 12 damaged with another one sharedbecame an Air Vice marshal in 1965. and left the RAF in 1966 taking a administrator position with the Ministry of Transport and in 1978 retiring to Norfolk . Sadly, he died on 1st March 2000.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo




Squadron Leader Maurice Peter Brown (deceased)
*Signature Value : £45 (matted)

Maurice Peter Brown (known as Peter) was born in London on 17th June 1919. On leaving school he qualified for entry in the civil service with an appointment in the Air Ministry. But in April 1938 he left to join the Royal Air Force with a short service commission. In September 1939 he was posted to 611 West Lancashire Squadron with Spitfires in 12 Group, initially at Duxford and then Digby. His initiation into battle was over Dunkirk. He was at readiness throughout the Battle of Britain, including with the controversial Ducford Big Wing on 15th September, when the Luftwaffe's morale was broken, and then in late September with 41 Squadron at Hornchurch where the fiercest fighting with highest casualties had taken place. It was a quantum leap. In June 1941, after serving as a flight commander in the squadron, Peter was posted as an instructor to 61 Operational Training Unit at Heston and other OTUs and then at AFUs as a Squadron Leader Flying. He left the RAF with the rank of Squadron Leader and was awarded the Air Force Cross. In his flying career, Maurice Peter Brown flew Spitfire Mk.I, Mk.II and Mk.V. We have learned the sad news that Maurice Peter Brown passed away on 20th January 2011.

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