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Pilot Signed Mosquito Prints by Philip West and Ivan Berryman. - IvanBerryman.com

DHM2716. Time To Go by Philip West. <p> Late 1944 and as the sun sets, Mark XIX Mosquito night fighters from 85 and 157 Squadrons based at RAF Swannington crew up for their next operation over hostile territory. These Mosquitoes scored many victories in the defence of Bomber Command aircraft and their crews during their relentless and dangerous missions over Germany. <b><p> Signed by Flight Lieutenant Robert Bruce, <br>Flight Lieutenant John Jock Cairns, <br>Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC*, <br>W O Donald J Jimmy Lowrie, <br>Flight Lieutenant Geoffrey Perks DFC, <br>H. E. Tappin (deceased) <br>and <br>Flying Officer Jim York DFC. <p> Signed limited edition of 150 prints. <p> Paper size 28 inches x 12.5 inches (71cm x 32cm)
DHM1031C. A Moments Peace by Ivan Berryman. <p> A De Havilland Mosquito patrols high above the clouds. This versatile all-wooden aircraft first flew on the 25th of November 1940. This aircraft was used in a wide variety of roles, including as a fighter-bomber and as a Pathfinder for bombers. <b><p> Signed by Flight Lieutenant Brian Beattie. <p>Beattie signature edition of 80 prints from the limited edition of 150 prints. <p> Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)

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  Website Price: £ 120.00  

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Pilot Signed Mosquito Prints by Philip West and Ivan Berryman.

PCK2007. Pilot Signed Mosquito Prints by Philip West and Ivan Berryman.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2716. Time To Go by Philip West.

Late 1944 and as the sun sets, Mark XIX Mosquito night fighters from 85 and 157 Squadrons based at RAF Swannington crew up for their next operation over hostile territory. These Mosquitoes scored many victories in the defence of Bomber Command aircraft and their crews during their relentless and dangerous missions over Germany.

Signed by Flight Lieutenant Robert Bruce,
Flight Lieutenant John Jock Cairns,
Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC*,
W O Donald J Jimmy Lowrie,
Flight Lieutenant Geoffrey Perks DFC,
H. E. Tappin (deceased)
and
Flying Officer Jim York DFC.

Signed limited edition of 150 prints.

Paper size 28 inches x 12.5 inches (71cm x 32cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1031C. A Moments Peace by Ivan Berryman.

A De Havilland Mosquito patrols high above the clouds. This versatile all-wooden aircraft first flew on the 25th of November 1940. This aircraft was used in a wide variety of roles, including as a fighter-bomber and as a Pathfinder for bombers.

Signed by Flight Lieutenant Brian Beattie.

Beattie signature edition of 80 prints from the limited edition of 150 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)


Website Price: £ 120.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £250.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £130




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Flight Lieutenant Geoffrey Perks DFC
*Signature Value : £35 (matted)

Joining the RAF in July 1941 he trained as a pilot in the USA and was posted to 420 Sqn as part of no 6 Group (RCAF) initially flying Wellingtons. The unit then converted to Halifaxes and he moved firstly to 427 Squadron and then 434 Sqn still flying this aircraft. In November 1944 he joined OTU as an instructor on Halifaxes, converting to Mosquitoes in January 1945. He then joined 571 Sqn as part of the Light Night Strike Force, flying the B Mk XVI and dropping 4000lb cookie bombs over Germany. He left the RAF in 1946 but rejoined, finally leaving in 1958


Flight Lieutenant John Jock Cairns
*Signature Value : £15 (matted)

Joined the RAFVR in May 1939 and was called up at the outbreak of war as a navigator. He completed his flying training by the early spring of 1941 and spent a brief period with 224 Squadron, Coastal Command before volunteering for Special Duties as a Navigator/Radio Leader. During training ‘Jock’ Cairns was crewed with an experienced pilot and posted to the prestigious 85 Squadron, Fighter Command and together with his pilot Sq/Ldr Simon Maude, DFC, achieved the destruction of a Dornier 217 during the Canterbury blitz. After six months rest from operations, John took over as the Navigator/Radio Leader of the Squadron – a short and lively tour intruding against Luftwaffe night-fighter airfields and interdiction of rail traffic during which five locomotives were destroyed. After another six months, Fl/Lt Cairns re-crewed with Fl/Lt John Hall and they enjoyed a very successful tour with 488 Squadron, RNZAF in 2nd TAF and were both credited with eight victories and each awarded the DFC with Bar.


Flight Lieutenant Robert Bruce
*Signature Value : £15 (matted)

Accepted for aircrew training in February 1942, but only entered Navigation School at Mount Hope, Ontario in March 1943. From there he went to Greenwood, Nova Scotia and was again delayed so that it was already almost Christmas 1943 when he met Sq/Ldr Russ Bannock RCAF, DSO, DFC and Bar, and was accepted by him as navigator. They reached No 418 Squadron RCAF who were Intruders in No 11 Group at D-Day and they destroyed a ME 110 landing at Bourges/Avord on 13/14 June. The Squadron was heavily engaged with VI Flying Bombs through July and August and they destroyed 19. Their other work was on Night Rangers over France and Germany and occasionally on Day Rangers mostly in the Baltic, usually paired with another Mosquito VI.Robert Bruce and Sq/Ldr D A MacFadyin DSO, DFC went to 406 Squadron to train them in Intruder techniques until the war ended and after that he went as Navigation Officer to No 29 Squadron.


Flying Officer Jim York DFC
*Signature Value : £15 (matted)

Joined the RAFVR in 1941 when he was just 19 and early in 1942 he was sent to America for pilot training as a cadet in the US Army Air Corps in Alabama and Georgia. After operational training in 1943 he spent some time ferrying Beaufighters around the Middle East. Early in 1944 he joined 85 Night Fighter Squadron, 11 Group Fighter Command, at West Malling in Kent, where he flew Mosquitoes on defensive night fighter patrols. In May 1944, 85 Squadron was transferred to 100 Group Bomber Command at Swannington in Norfolk where the Squadron initiated Bomber Support. This meant changing from defensive night fighting to offensive night fighting, attacking Luftwaffe night fighters over Germany. Each aircraft was a predator on its own without the benefit of any Ground Control. They patrolled Luftwaffe airfields, radar beacons and accompanied bomber streams, generally creating havoc amongst the German night fighters. Jim York stayed with the Squadron until the end of the war and completed 39 Operations over the continent destroying two enemy aircraft. Shortly after moving to Swannington, the Squadron was switched back to West Malling for a short spell to help deal with the VI flying bomb menace and Jim went on to destroy four of the V1 bombs over the English Channel. After the war he resumed his career as a Chartered Surveyor.


H. E. Tappin (deceased)
*Signature Value : £50 (matted)

Started flying, as an N.C.O. pilot, with the R.A.F.V.R. at No.3 E.& R.F.T.S. run by Air Service Training, at Hamble near Southampton.in April 1937. Awarded Pilot's Flying Badge (wings) in May 1938. Moved to 26 E.& R.F.T.S. run by Marshalls Flying School at Kidlington, near Oxford in September 1938. Flying Instructor's Course, November/December 1938 Started instructing 30th December 1938. School at-Kidlington closed on outbreak of hostilities, staff moved to 22 E.F.T.S. at Carpbridge. Instructed at Cambridge until April 1941, when posted to 52 O.T.U. (Hurricane) at Debden. Commissioned December 1940. 52 O.T.U. April/May 1941. Posted to 3 Squadron (Hurricane) at Martlesham Heath 2nd June 1941, became Flight Commander in March 1942. Posted to 534 Squadron (Turbinlite) as Hurricane Flight Commander September 1942. Tutbinlite Project abandoned February 1943,,posted to 157 Squadron (Mosquito) at Castle Camps. Became Flight Commander July 1943. Posted from 157 at Predannack, March 1944 to 51 O.T.U. at Cranfield and Twinwood Farm, near Bedford, as W/Cdr Flying. January 1945 posted to Mediterranean to command 108 Squadron (Beaufighter), to learn on arrival that the Squadron was to be disbanded. I spent a short period with 334 (Special Duties) Wing at Brindisi, in Southern Italy, and in March 1945 was posted to Command 256 Squaron (Mosquito) with the Desert Air Force at Forli, iii-Northern Italy. In September 1945 the Squadron moved to Egypt,, from where I returned home in December of that year. In February 1946 1 returned to Cambridge to continue my work with Marshalls as a civilian pilot, where the work was varied and interesting, covering flying-instruction, charter work and testflying on a variety of aircraft, including the Vampire, Venom, Canberra, Valiant, Viscount and Ambassador. I left Cambridge in January 1961 to instruct at The College of Air Training at Hamble, which had been set up by B.E.A. and B.O.A.C., (taking over the Air Service Training facilities) to train new pilots ?,rom scratch, as the supply of ex-service pilots was running short. It proved to be very successful. Retired from Hamble January 1972. Service Numbers: N.C.O. 740167. Commissioned Officer 89304. D.F.C. September 1942 Bar to D.F.C. April 1944. Died 8th January 2007.


Squadron Leader John Hall, DFC* (deceased)
*Signature Value : £20 (matted)

John Anthony Sanderson Hall was born in Oxford on Christmas Day 1921. His father was William Glenvil Hall, MP for Colne Valley and Financial Secretary to the Treasury in Attlee's government. From his father, a life-long Quaker, John inherited a belief in practical action rather than ideology, along with a sense of decency and respect for the rights of individuals. He attended the Quaker co-educational Leighton Park School, Reading, then worked briefly as a publisher's reader and studied at the Sorbonne before returning to this country and joining the RAF at the height of the Battle of Britain. After training as a night-fighter pilot, Hall joined No 85 Squadron, At that time, 85 Squadron flew twin engine Havocs, a night fighter version of the American light bomber, the Boston, with the radar operator where the Boston's gun turret would have been and 12 machine guns in the nose, in place of the Boston's navigator. The radar then was the Mark 4, not very reliable, and with a very limited range. During 1942, the Squadron re-equipped with the much faster and more maneuverable Mosquito, with a scanner in the nose for the infinitely more effective Mark 8 radar and 4 cannon. After excelling on an air gunnery course at the Central Gunnery School, Hall became an instructor at No 51 Operational Training Unit. He became an ardent believer in the need for fighter pilots to understand fully the basics of air-to-air shooting, something that he felt most of them lacked. He likened the problem to shooting game birds when an estimate of range, line and deflection held the key to success. Hall joined the New Zealanders of No 488 in November 1943, and was crewed up with Cairns, an experienced radar operator. Two months after their initial success, Hall and Cairns were on a routine patrol over Essex when they were directed to a contact flying at 18,000ft. They identified a Junkers 88, which they shot down and saw crash with a tremendous explosion. The enemy aircraft had landed on a group of dispersed bombers on the USAAF airfield at Earls Colne, severely damaging a number of them. Hall was doubtful about claiming this as a kill. He shot down another bomber off the Essex coast on April 19 1944. As he approached to land, he was told to wait until another Mosquito had landed ahead of him. In the event, the other Mosquito turned out to be a Junkers 88; the crew claimed they thought they were landing in Holland. After shooting down their fifth German bomber, as it attacked Bristol on May 22, both Hall and Cairns were awarded the DFC. Hall's citation described him as a highly efficient and courageous fighter. On the night before D-Day, Hall flew one of the many night fighters that patrolled over the beachhead keeping German bombers away from the invasion fleet. By mid-August, the crews of No 488 had destroyed 49 enemy aircraft. The sum of £50 had been accrued at various fund-raising events, and it was agreed that this should go to the ground crew of the aircraft achieving the squadron's 50th success. During the night of August 14/15, Hall attacked a German bomber, but it escaped. Shortly afterwards a second bomber was attacked and Hall succeeded in shooting it down 20 miles south of Caen, much to the delight of his ground crew. After moving to an advanced airfield in France, further success came on the night of December 23/24. Two days later, however, Hall had a narrow escape. Flying in atrocious weather in an attempt to support Allied troops under attack during the German's lightning Ardennes offensive, he was prevented by blizzards from returning to his base at Amiens. With virtually no fuel, he saw a light and crash-landed on a US forward grass airstrip and the Mosquito was wrecked. Hall scored his last kill on March 27 1945. He pressed home his attack from such close range that his Mosquito was hit by debris from the enemy bomber. The port engine was damaged and subsequently caught fire, but Hall managed to crash land on an airfield in Holland; his aircraft was almost completely burnt out. A few days later, he and Cairns each received a Bar to their DFCs. After leaving the RAF at the end of 1946, Hall went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, to read Law. He was called to the Bar by Inner Temple in November 1948, and joined chambers at Lamb Building. He died on 24th September 2015.


W O Donald J Jimmy Lowrie
*Signature Value : £15 (matted)

Joined the RAF in late 1941. His initial training was at Booker and Rhodesia. He qualified as a pilot in November 1942 before returning to the UK for AFU training at Perton until July 1942. The next six months was spent training aircrew on A.I. (Aircraft Interception). After this he was posted to 54 OTU Charterhall, where he crewed up with F/Sgt. Tom Davie. Jimmy then trained on Beaufighters based at 85 Squadron, West Malling, from March to May 1944. Thence to 239 Squadron, West Raynham on the formation of 100 Group. Jimmy completed 34 sorties before returning to 62 OTU to train more aircrew on A.I.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Flight Lieutenant Brian Beattie
*Signature Value : £30 (matted)

Having served at 489 Coastal Command flying torpedo carrying Hampdens, he later joined Des Curtis at 248 Sqn where he also flew the Tse-Tse firing Mosquito.

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