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Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)

Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)

Albert Gregory was born in Derby on 9th May 1917. Gregory joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in April 1939 as an Airman u/t Wop/Air Gunner. Called up on 1st September and posted to Aldegrove in October to commence Air Gunnery training in December 1939, Albert joined 141 Squadron at Grangemouth as an Air Gunner flying in Blenheims before the squadron converted to Defiants. He could not fly in the Defiant because he was too tall for the turret, so transferred to 219 squadron based at Catterick in May 1940 with whom he served throughout the Battle of Britain on Beaufighters. In September 1940 the introduction of Radar equipped Beaufighters meant Albert Gregory retrained as a Radio Observer and in March 1941 his aircraft accounted for the destruction of a He111. In May 1941, he went to no 2 Radio School at Yatesbury for a Wireless Operators course and passed out from this in September 1941. Albert then served with 23 Sqn in Boston IIIs on intruder patrols over occupied France, Belgium and Holland on bombing and strafing missions, before spending time with 275 and 278 (ASR) Squadrons. On 2nd April 1942 he damaged two Do 17s and in July 1942, Albert Gregory was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and was commissioned in August 1942. Albert later served with 278 (ASR) squadron and was released from the RAF in November 1945 with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. In July 1947 Albert Gregory rejoined the RAF and in February 1948 he was posted to 52 Squadron at Changi, Singapore. The squadron was engaged in Army support supply dropping and troop carrying in the anti-terrorist campaign in Malaya. In 1950 following his return to Britain, Albert became a signals instructor and retired from the RAF in May 1955. Sadly, he passed away on 12th November 2010.

Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)

 Boston IIIs of No 88 (Hong Kong) Squadron. These aircraft were involved in the search for the Scharnhorst in February 1942 and frequently attacked targets in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. ......
Tribute to the Boston Crews by Ivan Berryman.
Price : £60.00
Boston IIIs of No 88 (Hong Kong) Squadron. These aircraft were involved in the search for the Scharnhorst in February 1942 and frequently attacked targets in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. ......

Quantity:
 Boston IIIs of No 88 (Hong Kong) Squadron. These aircraft were involved in the search for the Scharnhorst in February 1942 and frequently attacked targets in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. ......
Tribute to the Boston Crews by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Price : £100.00
Boston IIIs of No 88 (Hong Kong) Squadron. These aircraft were involved in the search for the Scharnhorst in February 1942 and frequently attacked targets in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. ......

Quantity:
 Boston IIIs of No 88 (Hong Kong) Squadron. These aircraft were involved in the search for the Scharnhorst in February 1942 and frequently attacked targets in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. ......
Tribute to the Boston Crews by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Price : £260.00
Boston IIIs of No 88 (Hong Kong) Squadron. These aircraft were involved in the search for the Scharnhorst in February 1942 and frequently attacked targets in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. ......

Quantity:
 Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron. ......
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.
Price : £60.00
Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron. ......

Quantity:
 Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron. ......
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Price : £75.00
Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron. ......

Quantity:
 Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron. ......
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Price : £360.00
Royal Air Force Blenheim Mk.I aircraft of No.141 Squadron. ......

Quantity:
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor.
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England.  It wa......Those Valiant Few by Robert Taylor. (B)
SOLD OUT
The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goerings Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It wa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 If you had the height, you controlled the battle. If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you. If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed. These three basic rules contributed to the prowess in aerial combat of som......
Height and Sun by Robert Taylor. (AP)
SOLD OUT
If you had the height, you controlled the battle. If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you. If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed. These three basic rules contributed to the prowess in aerial combat of som......NOT
AVAILABLE
 If you had the height, you controlled the battle. If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you. If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed. These three basic rules contributed to the prowess in aerial combat of som......
Height and Sun by Robert Taylor. (B)
SOLD OUT
If you had the height, you controlled the battle. If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you. If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed. These three basic rules contributed to the prowess in aerial combat of som......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)


RAF Aviation Print Pack
Pack Price : £210.00
Saving : £120
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman.
Tribute to the Boston Crews by Ivan Berryman.
Beaufighter Attack by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:

RAF Aircraft Print Pack
Pack Price : £210.00
Saving : £110
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Tribute to the Boston Crews by Ivan Berryman.
Beaufighter Attack by Ivan Berryman.
Ready for the Off - Blenheim of No.25 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
Pack 896. Pack of two Blenheim aircraft aviation prints by Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £115.00
Saving : £45
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Ready for the Off - Blenheim of No.25 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
Pack 952. Pack of two British WW2 Bomber prints by Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £120.00
Saving : £40
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Tribute to the Boston Crews by Ivan Berryman.
Beaufighter Attack by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
RAF Bristol Blenheim Aviation Print Pack.
Pack Price : £115.00
Saving : £45
With signatures of Joseph Chamberlain and Albert Gregory. ......

Titles in this pack :

Ready for the Off - Blenheim of No.25 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
Aircrew Signed Bristol Blenheim Aviation Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack : SOLD OUT
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Blenheims Over Norfolk by Stephen Brown.
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.
NOT
AVAILABLE
WW2 Britsol Blenheim Aircraft Prints by Stephen Brown and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £160.00
Saving : £15
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Blenheims Over Norfolk by Stephen Brown.
Mk.I Blenheims of No.141 Sqn by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)

Squadrons for : Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.141 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st March 1964

Caedimus noctu - We slay by night

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.141 Sqn RAF

No.141 Sqn RAF

No. 141 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was formed on 1 January 1918 at Rochford, for home defence in the London Area. The Squadron moved to RAF Biggin Hill in February and giving up its mixed collection of types in favour of Bristol F.2 Fighters during March. In March 1919, it moved to Ireland, and was disbanded the following year, on 1 February 1920. On 4 October 1939, No 141 reformed at Turnhouse and by the end of the month had received some Gladiators followed shortly afterwards by Blenheims and these two types formed the training equipment of the until the arrival of Defiants in April 1940. Becoming operational on this type on 3 June 1940, the first operational patrol was flown by No 141 on 29 June and in July it moved to West Malling. The maintenance flight was based at Biggin Hill while the Defiants used Hawkinge as an advanced airfield and it was from the latter that the Squadron had its first and last daylight encounter with the enemy. Six out of nine aircraft were lost over the Channel to Me 109s and the squadron was withdrawn to Prestwick two days later as the ineffectiveness of the Defiant against single-seat fighters became evident. In September, a detachment was sent back to southern England but this time for night patrols and the whole squadron moved there in October. In April 1941, No. 141 returned to Scotland where it converted to Beaufighters for the defence of central Scotland and north-east England. In June 1942 it moved to Tangmere for local defence and in February 1943 to south-west England where it began flying intruder missions over north-west France. At the end of April 1943, it was transferred to Wittering and began flying intruder sorties over German airfields in support of Bomber Command in June. Mosquitoes began to replace the Beaufighters in October and in December the Squadron joined No. 100 Group, sending aircraft with Bomber Command's main force to attack enemy night-fighters and their bases. This type of operation continued until the German surrender and on 7 September 1945 the Squadron was disbanded. On 17 June 1946, No. 141 reformed at Wittering, again as a Mosquito night-fighter Squadron. In September 1951, it began to convert to Meteors and replaced these with Venoms in 1955. Javelins began to arrive in February 1957 and were flown until the Squadron was renumbered 41 Squadron on 1 February 1958. On 1 April 1959, No. 141 was reformed as a Bloodhound anti-aircraft missile unit at Dunholme Lodge, disbanding on 31 March 1964.

No.219 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 22nd July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st July 1957

From dusk till dawn

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.219 Sqn RAF

No.219 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.23 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915
Fate : The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.

Semper aggessus - Always having attacked

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.23 Sqn RAF

No.23 Sqn RAF

o. 23 Squadron formed at Fort Grange, Gosport on 1 Sep 1915 under the command of one of the RAF's most experienced operational pilots - Captain Louis Strange. After a brief period attempting to counter German airship flights over London, the Squadron moved to France with its FE2Bs initially employed on escort duties. By early 1917, Spad single-seaters had arrived, and were being used on offensive patrols over the front and low-level strafing attacks against German troops By the end of the War, the Squadron had converted to Dolphins, and flew these until disbanded at the end of 1919. On 1 July 1925, No. 23 Squadron reformed at Henlow with Snipes, but these were replaced shortly after with Gloster Gamecocks. In 1931, the Squadron was tasked with carrying out trials on the new Hawker Hart two-seaters, taking the production version, known as Demons, on strength in 1933 n 1938 it became a night-fighter squadron using the Bristol Blenheim. Following the outbreak of the Second World War, these were replaced by the Douglas Havoc and later the de Havilland Mosquito. Between 1942 and 1944 the squadron was based on Malta. It then returned to England and served as an intruder squadron, targeting German night fighters, over western Europe. 23 Sqn was disbanded, following the war's end, in September 1945 The squadron was reformed on 1 September 1946 as a night fighter squadron operating the de Havilland Mosquito.[8] It received jet aircraft in the form of de Havilland Vampire NF.10s in 1953, replacing them with de Havilland Venom NF.2s in June 1954. The squadron acquired Venom NF.3 in 1957.but was soon replaced with Gloster Javelin all-weather fighter, beginning a long period operating in the air defence role. The squadron has a strong heritage in the air defence role, operating Gloster Javelins, Lightnings, Phantoms and Tornado F3s. The squadron first acquired Phantoms on 1 November 1975 at RAF Coningsby before moving to RAF Wattisham for just under 10 years. Then in October 1983 the squadron deployed to Stanley airfield, Falkland Islands after their recapture from Argentina, arriving there on 1 November. They remained here until 31 October 1988 when its duty was assumed by 1435 Flight. The squadron then reformed on 1 November 1988 at RAF Leeming with the Panavia Tornado which it operated until 26 February 1994, when the unit was disbanded. The squadron assumed the Airborne Early Warning role upon reformation in April 1996, sharing the RAF's Sentry AEW1 fleet with No. 8 Squadron. The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.
Aircraft for : Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Beaufighter



Click the name above to see prints featuring Beaufighter aircraft.

Manufacturer : Bristol
Production Began : 1940
Number Built : 5564

Beaufighter

BRISTOL BEAUFIGHTER The Bristol Beaufighter was a Torpedo Bomber and had a crew of two. with a maximum speed of 330mph and a ceiling of 29,000 feet. maximum normal range of 1500 miles but could be extended to 1750 miles. The Bristol Beaufighter carried four 20mm cannon in the belly of the aircraft and upto six .303in browning machine guns in the wings. it could also carry eight 3 -inch rockets, 1605 lb torpedo or a bomb load of 1,000 lb. The Bristol Beaufighter first flew in July 1939 and with some modifications entered service with the Royal Air Force in July 1940. In the winter of 1940 - 1941 the Beaufighter was used as a night fighter. and in March 1941 the aircraft was used at Coastal Command as a long range strike aircraft. and in 1941, the Beaufighter arrived in North Africa and used as a forward ground attack aircraft. The Bristol Beaufighter was used also in India, Burma and Australia. A total of 5,564 Beaufighters were built until production in Britain finished in 1945, but a further 364 were built in Australia for the Australian Air Force

Blenheim

Click the name above to see prints featuring Blenheim aircraft.

Manufacturer : Bristol
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1956
Number Built : 4422

Blenheim

The Bristol Blenheim, the most plentiful aircraft in the RAFs inventory when WWII began, was designed by Frank Barnwell, and when first flown in 1936 was unique with its all metal monoplane design incorporating a retractable undercarriage, wing flaps, metal props, and supercharged engines. A typical bomb load for a Blenheim was 1,000 pounds. In the early stages of the war Blenheims were used on many daylight bombing missions. On the day that war was declared on Germany, a Blenheim piloted by Flying Officer Andrew McPherson was the first British aircraft to cross the German coast and the following morning 15 Blenheims from three squadrons set off on one of the first bombing missions The Blenheim units operated throughout the battle, often taking heavy casualties, although they were never accorded the publicity of the fighter squadrons. The Blenheim units raided German occupied airfields throughout July to December 1940, both during daylight hours and at night. Although most of these raids were unproductive, there were some successes; on 1 August five out of 12 Blenheims sent to attack Haamstede and Evere (Brussels) were able to bomb, destroying or heavily damaging three Bf 109s of II./JG 27 and apparently killing a Staffelkapitän identified as Hauptmann Albrecht von Ankum-Frank. Two other 109s were claimed by Blenheim gunners. Another successful raid on Haamstede was made by a single Blenheim on 7 August which destroyed one 109 of 4./JG 54, heavily damaged another and caused lighter damage to four more. There were also some missions which produced an almost 100% casualty rate amongst the Blenheims. One such operation was mounted on 13 August 1940 against a Luftwaffe airfield near Aalborg in north-western Denmark by 12 aircraft of 82 Squadron. One Blenheim returned early (the pilot was later charged and due to appear before a court martial, but was killed on another operation); the other 11, which reached Denmark, were shot down, five by flak and six by Bf 109s. Blenheim-equipped units had been formed to carry out long-range strategic reconnaissance missions over Germany and German-occupied territories, as well as bombing operations. In this role, the Blenheims once again proved to be too slow and vulnerable against Luftwaffe fighters and they took constant casualties While great heroism was displayed by the air crews, tremendous losses were sustained during these missions. The Blenhiem was easy pickings at altitude for German Bf-109 fighters who quickly learned to attack from below. To protect the vulnerable bellies of the Blenheims many missions were shifted to low altitude, but this increased the aircrafts exposure to anti-aircraft fire. In the German night-bombing raid on London on 18 June 1940, Blenheims accounted for five German bombers, thus proving that they were better-suited for night fighting. In July, No. 600 Squadron, by then based at RAF Manston, had some of its Mk IFs equipped with AI Mk III radar. With this radar equipment, a Blenheim from the Fighter Interception Unit (FIU) at RAF Ford achieved the first success on the night of 2–3 July 1940, accounting for a Dornier Do 17 bomber. More successes came, and before long the Blenheim proved itself invaluable as a night fighter. One Blenheim pilot, Squadron Leader Arthur Scarf, was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for an attack on Singora, Thailand, on 9 December 1941. Another bomber of No. 60 Squadron RAF was credited with shooting down Lt Col Tateo Katō's Nakajima Ki-43 fighter and badly damaging two others in a single engagement on 22 May 1942, over the Bay of Bengal. Katō's death was a severe blow to the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force.

Boston

Click the name above to see prints featuring Boston aircraft.

Manufacturer : Douglas Aircraft Company
Production Began : 1941
Retired : 1849
Number Built : 1942

Boston

There are three marks, the I has two 1,050hp PW Wasps, the II has two 1,200hp PW Wasps and the III has two 1,600hp Wright Cyclones. The Boston I was used by the RAF as a trainer and the II was used as a night fighter and called the Havoc I. The French order called for substantial modifications, resulting in the DB-7 (for Douglas Bomber 7) variant. It had a narrower, deeper fuselage, 1,000 hp (746 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830-SC3-G radials, French-built guns, and metric instruments. Midway through the delivery phase, engines were switched to 1,100 hp (820 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S3C4-G. The French designation was DB-7 B-3 (the B-3 signifying "three-seat bomber"). The DB-7s were shipped in sections to Casablanca for assembly and service in France and French North Africa. When the Germans attacked France and the Low Countries on 10 May 1940, the 64 available DB-7s were deployed against the advancing Germans. Before the armistice they were evacuated to North Africa to avoid capture by German forces. Here, they fell under control of the Vichy government and briefly engaged the Allies during Operation Torch. After French forces in North Africa had sided with the Allies, DB-7s were used as trainers and were replaced in front line units by Martin B-26 Marauders. In early 1945, a few DB-7s were moved back to France, where they saw action against the remaining isolated German pockets on the western coast. The remainder of the order which was to have been delivered to France was instead taken up by the UK via the British Purchasing Commission. In the course of the war, 24 squadrons operated the Boston. The type saw its first active operations with the RAF in early 1941, when 181 Boston IIs began to be deployed in night fighter and intruder roles. On 4 July 1942 United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) bomber crews, flying RAF Boston aircraft, took part in operations in Europe for the first time attacking enemy airfields in the Netherlands. They replaced the Bristol Blenheims of No. 2 Group RAF for daylight operations against occupied Europe until replaced in turn by de Havilland Mosquitos. Some Havocs were converted to Turbinlite aircraft which replaced the nose position with a powerful searchlight. The Turbinlite aircraft would be brought onto an enemy fighter by ground radar control. The onboard radar operator would then direct the pilot until he could illuminate the enemy. At that point a Hawker Hurricane fighter accompanying the Turbinlite aircraft would make the attack. The Turbinlite squadrons were disbanded in early 1943. The III is now used in large numbers on fighter escorted raids on France and the Low Countries and is also used extensively in the Middle East. They have done very good work, and with the Ventura have replaced the Blenheim in this country. The Mk.III is also used as a night fighter and is known as the Havoc II. The A-20G became the largest production run of the Havoc series, numbering some 2,850 total aircraft. The A-20G followed on the heels of the A-20C production model and was a dedicated ground attack platform as opposed to the light bomber designation carried by preceding models. The initial production A-20G block (259 total A-20G-1's) featured the distinctive solid nose assembly mounting 4 x 20mm cannons (deleting the bombardier's nose position and bringing the crew total down to three personnel). The follow-up production block (Block 5) reverted back to a more conventional array of 6 x 12.7mm machine guns as the cannons were prone to jamming and offered up a slow rate of fire. The cannon-armed versions were mostly operated under the Soviet banner via Lend-Lease and understandably proved quite devastating in the ground attack role. Additional armament for either form of this aircraft included 2 x 12.7mm machine guns in a flexible dorsal position and a single 7.62mm machine gun in the ventral position (flexible mount). Bomb load totalled 2,000lbs of internally-held ordnance and/or 374-gallon drop tank. Engines for the aircraft were Wright R-2600-23 Cyclone supercharged radials of 1,600 horsepower each. Top speed was 317 miles per hour with a combat range of 950 miles and a modest ceiling of 23,700 feet.

Defiant



Click the name above to see prints featuring Defiant aircraft.

Manufacturer : Boulton Paul
Production Began : 1939
Number Built : 1075

Defiant

BOULTON PAUL DEFIANT Built as a fighter, with a crew of two. Maximum speed of 304 mph, and a ceiling of 30,350 feet. armament on the defiant was four .303 browing machine guns in the Boulton Paul Turret. Designed as a intercepter fighter, the Defiant first flew in August 1937. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in October 1939 with no 264 squadron. and first flew in operations in march 1940 the Boulton Paul Defiant was certainly no match for the German Fighters, due to their lack of fire power as the defiant had no wing mounted machine guns. Heavy losses. The aircraft was re deployed as a night -Fighter in the autumn of 1940. This role also being taken over by Bristol Beaufighters in 1941, leaving the defiant for training, target tug, and air-sea rescue roles. A Total of 1075 Boulton Paul Defiant's were built

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