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Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)


The signature of Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)

Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)

Group Captain Thomas Gilbert "Hamish" Mahaddie. DSO, DFC, AFC.. CzMC. Nos 7, 55, and 77 Squadrons. Born In Keith, Edinburgh, on 19 March 1911. He joined the RAF as a part of the 17th Entry at Halton in 1928 and trained as a metal rigger, after which he was posted to Cranwell on ground servicing duties. In 1933 he boarded a troopship bound for the Middle East where he joined No 4 FTS at Abu Suler for pilot training. He gained his wings in 1935 and his first air crew posting was to No 55 Squadron at Hinaldi flying Westland Wapitis. On his return to England in 1937 he joined No 77 Squadron flying Whitleys from Driffield. During World War II he completed a tour of operations with No 77 Squadron before moving to Klnloss to instruct with No 14 OTU. He completed another tour, this time with No 7 Squadron at Oakington on Stirlings, before joining HQ Staff of No 8 (Pathfinder) Group. Group Captain Mahaddie finished the war as Station Commander at RAF Warboys, home of PFF Navigation Training Unit. In June 1945 he was appointed to command No 111 Wing in Germany followed by a spell at the Staff College, Haifa, In 1947. His postwar duties also included two tours of duty at the Air Ministry, as OC Flying Wing at Binbrook, and also as Station Commander at Sylt and Butzwellerhof in Germany. He finally retired from the RAF in 1958 and has since been involved with the film Industry as an aviation consultant specialising in electronics for all three services. Hamish Mahaddie died 16th January 1997.

Awarded the Distinguished Service OrderAwarded the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Service Order
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)

 Sunday 8th April 1945. Halifax B.II Series 1 (Special) JP254 of 148 Special Duties Squadron, RAF piloted by Pilot officer Bill Leckie is depicted approaching the drop zone near to the Alt Aussee salt mine in the Austrian Alps to drop four SOE agents......
Operation Ebensburg by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Price : £360.00
Sunday 8th April 1945. Halifax B.II Series 1 (Special) JP254 of 148 Special Duties Squadron, RAF piloted by Pilot officer Bill Leckie is depicted approaching the drop zone near to the Alt Aussee salt mine in the Austrian Alps to drop four SOE agents......

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 Halifax B.II Series 1 (Special) JP254 of 148 Special Duties Squadron, RAF is depicted over the drop zone near to the Alt Aussee salt mine in the Austrian Alps as two of the four SOE agents exit the bomber via the crew access door.  Their mission was......
SOE Drop by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Price : £420.00
Halifax B.II Series 1 (Special) JP254 of 148 Special Duties Squadron, RAF is depicted over the drop zone near to the Alt Aussee salt mine in the Austrian Alps as two of the four SOE agents exit the bomber via the crew access door. Their mission was......

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 On the evening of 17th August 1943, a total of 596 aircraft of RAF Bomber Command, spearheaded by the Pathfinder Force, set out on what called for, and what became, the most precise bombing raid of the war.  Success was vital.  The target was a secl......
Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Price : £265.00
On the evening of 17th August 1943, a total of 596 aircraft of RAF Bomber Command, spearheaded by the Pathfinder Force, set out on what called for, and what became, the most precise bombing raid of the war. Success was vital. The target was a secl......

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 On the evening of 17th August 1943, a total of 596 aircraft of RAF Bomber Command, spearheaded by the Pathfinder Force, set out on what called for, and what became, the most precise bombing raid of the war.  Success was vital.  The target was a secl......
Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor. (AP)
SOLD OUT
On the evening of 17th August 1943, a total of 596 aircraft of RAF Bomber Command, spearheaded by the Pathfinder Force, set out on what called for, and what became, the most precise bombing raid of the war. Success was vital. The target was a secl......NOT
AVAILABLE
 On the evening of 17th August 1943, a total of 596 aircraft of RAF Bomber Command, spearheaded by the Pathfinder Force, set out on what called for, and what became, the most precise bombing raid of the war.  Success was vital.  The target was a secl......
Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor. (B)
SOLD OUT
On the evening of 17th August 1943, a total of 596 aircraft of RAF Bomber Command, spearheaded by the Pathfinder Force, set out on what called for, and what became, the most precise bombing raid of the war. Success was vital. The target was a secl......NOT
AVAILABLE
On August 15th 1942, under the leadership of Don Bennet, a new group was formed from Bomber Command to develop specialised target finding and target  marking. Made up purely from experienced volunteers, this elite and highly trained group of men were......Leading the Way by Gerald Coulson. (B)
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On August 15th 1942, under the leadership of Don Bennet, a new group was formed from Bomber Command to develop specialised target finding and target marking. Made up purely from experienced volunteers, this elite and highly trained group of men were......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Short Stirling was the RAFs first four-engined bomber but was handicapped by a low operational ceiling. Thus, Stirling crews spent much of their time flying through the flak rather than above flak. However, the Stirling possessed a strong, highl......Stirlings Outward Bound by Robert Taylor.
Price : £120.00
The Short Stirling was the RAFs first four-engined bomber but was handicapped by a low operational ceiling. Thus, Stirling crews spent much of their time flying through the flak rather than above flak. However, the Stirling possessed a strong, highl......

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 With the departure of No 1 Group in May 1943, No 4 Group's 78 Sqn Halifaxes arrived at Breighton in Yorkshire from where they would continue to operate until the end of the war.  Halifax III LW291 (EY-M) is depicted snowbound in the Winter of 19......
White-out at Breighton - Tribute to No.78 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Price : £420.00
With the departure of No 1 Group in May 1943, No 4 Group's 78 Sqn Halifaxes arrived at Breighton in Yorkshire from where they would continue to operate until the end of the war. Halifax III LW291 (EY-M) is depicted snowbound in the Winter of 19......

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Enemy Coast Ahead by M A Kinnear. (AP)
Price : £190.00
......

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Avro Lancaster W4118 (ZN-Y) piloted by Wing Commander G.P. Gibson CO of 106 squadron en-route to attack Schneider Armament works at Le Creusot in 1942. ......
Enemy Coast Ahead by M A Kinnear (B)
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Avro Lancaster W4118 (ZN-Y) piloted by Wing Commander G.P. Gibson CO of 106 squadron en-route to attack Schneider Armament works at Le Creusot in 1942. ......NOT
AVAILABLE
 Remembered fondly by many RAF, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand bomber crews, the Halifax served many diverse roles in WWII, including service with Special Duties, dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines. Halifax MkIIs of 35 Squadron, RA......Pathfinder Halifax by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Price : £320.00
Remembered fondly by many RAF, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand bomber crews, the Halifax served many diverse roles in WWII, including service with Special Duties, dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines. Halifax MkIIs of 35 Squadron, RA......

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On April 25th 1945, the RAF despatched over 300 Lancasters to attack The Eagles Nest, Hitlers private mountain top castle at Berchstegaden.  It was a symbolic raid, for the war was almost over, but it seemed appropriate that, after almost six years o......
Escort for the Straggler by Robert Taylor.
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On April 25th 1945, the RAF despatched over 300 Lancasters to attack The Eagles Nest, Hitlers private mountain top castle at Berchstegaden. It was a symbolic raid, for the war was almost over, but it seemed appropriate that, after almost six years o......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)


RAF Lancaster Bomber Print Pack.
Pack Price : £340.00
Saving : £425
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
One Hundred Up! by Simon Atack.
Operation Manna by Ivan Berryman.

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Robert Taylor Lancaster Print Pack.
Pack Price : £400.00
Saving : £225
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Duel in the Dark by Robert Taylor.

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Avro Lancaster Print Pack by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £330.00
Saving : £165
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Avro Lancaster B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (D)

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Lancaster Aircraft Aviation Print Pack by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £300.00
Saving : £135
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Chadwicks Masterpiece by Ivan Berryman.

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WW2 Lancaster Bomber Prints by Robert Taylor and Gerald Coulson.
Pack Price : £350.00
Saving : £150
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Outbound Lancaster by Gerald Coulson. (C)

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Pilot and Aircrew Signed Lancaster Prints by Robert Taylor and Simon Smith.
Pack Price : £325.00
Saving : £290
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
The Shining Sword by Simon Smith.

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Aircrew Signed Avro Lancaster Prints by Robert Taylor and Gerald Coulson.
Pack Price : £320.00
Saving : £245
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson. (B)

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Signed Lancaster Bomber Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £300.00
Saving : £150
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman. (C)

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Crew Signed Avro Lancaster Aviation Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £320.00
Saving : £165
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Nursing Her Home by Ivan Berryman. (B)

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Signed Avro Lancaster Bomber Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £400.00
Saving : £270
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.

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Classic Lancaster Bomber Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Robert Taylor.
Pack Price : £370.00
Saving : £355
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.

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Crew Signed Avro Lancaster WW2 Bomber Prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £300.00
Saving : £170
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Mynarskis Lanc by Nicolas Trudgian.

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WW2 Lancaster Bomber Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Robert Taylor.
Pack Price : £320.00
Saving : £235
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
Moonlight Hunter by Nicolas Trudgian.

Quantity:
Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)

Squadrons for : Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

111 Wing

Country : UK

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of 111 Wing
111 Wing

Full profile not yet available.

No.55 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th June 1916
Fate : With the end of the Victors, No 55 was disbanded,

Nil nos tremefacit - Nothing shakes us

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.55 Sqn RAF

No.55 Sqn RAF

No. 55 Squadron was formed at Castle Bromwich on 27 April 1916. It initially operated as a training unit, flying a mixture of types, including the Avro 504, Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2 and the Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8, but in January 1917 it changed its role to a day-bomber squadron and re-equipped with the Airco DH.4, being the first squadron to receive the new light bomber. It took these to France on 6 March that year as part of 9th Wing, flying its first bombing mission against Valenciennes railway station on 23 April 1917 in support of the Battle of Arras. It became part of the Independent Air Force as part of No 41 Wing based at Azelot, carrying out daylight strategic bombing missions against targets in Germany. 55 Squadron developed tactics of flying in wedge formations, bombing on the leader's command and with the massed defensive fire of the formation deterring attacks by enemy fighters. Despite heavy losses, 55 Squadron continued in operation, the only one of the day bombing squadrons in the Independent Force which did not have to temporarily stand down owing to aircrew losses. The squadron flew 221 bombing missions during the war, dropping approximately 141 long tons (143,000 kg) of bombs during the war. Following the Armistice on 11 November 1918, 55 Squadron was briefly used to run airmail services to British forces, before returning to the United Kingdom and losing its aircraft in January 1919, formally disbanding on 22 January 1920 On 1 February 1920, the unit was reformed at Suez with the renumbering of No 142 Squadron, and the unit embarked its DH9s on board HMS Ark Royal for transport to Turkey as part of 'Q' Force, assisting the Army in the defence of Constantinople and the Dardenelles. Two months later in August, the Squadron took up 'air policing' duties in Iraq, a task that was to last for the next 19 years. Wapitis (1930) and Vincents (1937) subsequently replaced the DH9s and the Squadron's first monoplane, the Blenheim, arrived in March 1939. Between September 1939 and June 1940, the Squadron patrolled the Suez region until Italy joined the War and bombing raids over Libya began. In March 1942, Baltimores replaced the Blenheims, and the unit supported the Eighth Army as it advanced through the Eastern Desert and into Italy. After re-equipping with Bostons in October 1944, No 55 remained in Italy, transferring to Hassani, Greece in September 1945 and receiving Mosquitos. The Squadron was disbanded in November 1946 and remained absent from the RAF's Order of Battle until 1 September 1960, when it reformed at Honington with Victors as part of Bomber Command's famous 'V' Force. May 1965 saw No 55 begin air-to-air refuelling duties, a role it continued until the retirement of the very last Victors in 1993. During this time, the Squadron took part in Operation Corporate, alongside its fellow Victor squadron, No 57, 55 Squadron provided tanker support during the Falklands War in 1982, including for the Operation Black Buck raids, where they refuelled Avro Vulcan bombers to allow them to reach the Falklands from Ascension Island. 55 Squadron's Victors went to war again in 1991, when it was deployed to the Gulf as part of Operation Granby, Britain's response to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, refuelling coalition aircraft during Operation Desert Storm. It disbanded on 15 October 1993, the last Squadron to operate the Victor. With the end of the Victors, No 55 was disbanded,

No.7 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st May 1914

Per diem per noctem - By day and by night

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.7 Sqn RAF

No.7 Sqn RAF

No.7 Squadron was formed 1st May 1914 at Farnborough as a Scout squadron, and went to France April 1915, equipped with the Vickers Gunbus. No.7 squadron saw service through the war with BE2c, RE5 and RE8 aircraft. The squadron pioneered the use of R/T (instead of normal W/T), using it operationally for the first time in October 1918. Disbanded at Farnborough on 31st December 1919 it reformed at Bircham Newton on 1st June 1923 equipped with Vickers Vimy bombers. These were replaced by the Vickers Virginia after moving to Worthy Down in April 1927. Between the wars No.7 squadron was equipped with various aircraft including the Handley Page Heyfords, Vickers Wellesleys and Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys and became the leading bomber squadron, winning the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy more than any other squadron. At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron was equipped with Handley Page Hampdens, until August 1940, when it equipped with the RAF's first four engined bomber, the Short Stirling Mk I - becoming the first RAF squadron to be equipped with four engined bombers. The first raid by No.7 was 10th February 1941 on Rotterdam. The squadron settled down to a night bombing role, adding mine laying to its duties in 1942. Later with four other squadrons, it formed the nucleus of the new Pathfinder Force, its task to find and accurately mark targets with flares. In May 1943, the Stirling (which was handicapped by a low operational ceiling - it had to fly through flak rather than over it) was gradually replaced by the Avro Lancaster, which No.7 used in Peenemunde in August. From June1944 and until the end of the war, the squadron also undertook a daylight operational role in support of land forces in France and the low countries, and against V-1 and V-2 sites. No.7 squadron flew to Singapore in January 1947, and converted to Avro Lincolns, seeing action against Communist terrorists in Malay, during 'Operation Firedog'. Returning to UK, having won the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy outright for the eighth time it was disbanded 1st January 1956. Reforming in November of the same year with the Vickers Valiant 'V' bomber. Disbanded on 30th September 1962, it was reformed in May 1970 at RAF St. Mawgan on target provision duties. Equipped with the English Electric Canberra, the squadron provided targets for the Army and Navy anti aircraft guns. They also provided silent targets for radar station practice. On 12th December 1981 the squadron was again disbanded, reforming soon after as the second operational Boeing Vertol Chinook helicopter Squadron on 2nd September 1982.

No.77 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st October 1916
Fate : Disbanded 10th July 1963

Ease potius quam videri - To be, rather than seen

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.77 Sqn RAF

No.77 Sqn RAF

No. 77 Squadron was formed on 1 October 1916 at Edinburgh, and was equipped with B.E.2 and B.E.12 aircraft. The squadron disbanded at RAF Turnhouse on 13 June 1919. In June 1937, No. 77 Squadron was re-formed at Finningley, Yorkshire, as a bomber unit. No. 77 was employed on reconnaissance and Security Patrols during the early months of the war and in the course of some of its Security Patrols dropped bombs on what appeared to be harbour and seaplane base landing lights at or near Borkum, Sylt and Nordeney. The spring of 1940 saw the squadron start bombing in earnest and during the period March to June it figured in several notable Bomber Command "firsts". On 19/2Oth March it took part in the first attack on an enemy land target (Hornum, on the island of Sylt); on 11/12th May it took part in the first big attack on the German mainland (the exits of Munchen-Gladbach); and on 11/12th June it took part in the first attack on Italy (primary target the Fiat works at Turin). No. 77 Squadron continued its offensive against enemy land targets until April 1941, and then, early in May, was posted to Chivenor, North Devon, for temporary duty with No. 19 Group, Coastal Command. From Chivenor the Whitleys were mainly employed on flying anti-submarine patrols over the Bay of Biscay and on 3rd September one of them attacked and sank with depth charges U-705. In October 1942, the squadron converted to Halifaxes at RAF Elvington, moving to RAF Full Sutton in May 1944. in addition to playing a prominent part in the bomber offensive, also participated in Bomber Command's highly-successful Gardening, or minelaying, campaign On 8 May 1945 the squadron joined Transport Command, and in July 1945 re-equipped with Douglas Dakotas. The squadron moved to Broadwell in August 1945 followed by a posting to India in October 1945. The squadron was disbanded by being renumbered as No. 31 Squadron on 1 November 1946. The squadron was again reformed - as 77(SM) Sqn. - on 1 September 1958 as one of 20 Strategic Missile (SM) squadrons associated with Project Emily. The squadron was equipped with three Thor Intermediate range ballistic missiles, and based at RAF Feltwell.
Aircraft for : Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Stirling



Click the name above to see prints featuring Stirling aircraft.

Manufacturer : Short
Production Began : 1939
Number Built : 2381

Stirling

The Royal Air Force's first four engined monoplane Bomber, the Short Stirling first flew in May 1939 and entered front line service in August 1940 with no. 7 squadron. Due to its poor operational ceiling the aircraft sustained heavy losses and by mid 1942 the Stirling was beginning to be replaced by the Lancaster. Improved versions of the Short Stirling were built for Glider towing, paratroopers and heavy transport. also from 1943 many of the Stirling's were used for mine laying. A total of 2381 Stirling's were built for the Royal air Force and from this total 641 Stirling bombers were lost to enemy action. Crew 7 or 8: Speed: 260 mph (MK1) 275mph (MKIII) and 280mph (MKV)Service ceiling 17,000 feet Range: 2330 miles. (MK1) 2010 miles (MKIII) and 3,000 miles (MKV) Armament: two .303 Vickers machine guns. in nose turret, two .303 in browning machine guns in dorsal turret , Four .303 Browning machine guns in tail turret. Bomb Load 14,000 Lbs Engines: four 1150 Hp Bristol Hercules II (MK1) four 1650 hp Bristol Hercules XVI (MK111 and MKV)

Wapiti

Click the name above to see prints featuring Wapiti aircraft.

Manufacturer : Westland
Production Began : 1927
Retired : 1944
Number Built : 558

Wapiti

The prototype first flew on 7 March 1927. Initial tests showed poor control, and the prototype was modified with a much larger tail and horn-balanced ailerons, solving these problems. (It was later discovered that a 2-foot (0.61 m) fuselage section had been omitted from the prototype – as handling was now acceptable, it was not reinstated.) The Wapiti performed well during RAF trials, while using significant amounts of DH.9A components, and was declared the winner of the competition, an initial contract for 25 aircraft being placed in October 1927. The Wapita entered service with No. 84 Squadron RAF in Iraq in June 1928. It was heavily used in Iraq and India in the Army Cooperation role, acting also sometimes as a bomber or reconnaissance aircraft. Wapitis of No. 20 squadron escorted Victoria troop carriers in the evacuation of Kabul (the Kabul Airlift) in December 1928. It was still in service in India until 1942. In Britain, Wapitis served with the Auxiliary Air Force from 1929 to 1937. It was also flown by Australia and Canada, where it saw service at the start of the Second World War. The prototype Wapiti V, registered G-AAWA, was used for demonstration flights in Argentina and Uruguay on floats, powered by a 550 hp Armstrong Siddeley Panther IIA engine. It was later modified as the Bristol Pegasus-powered Westland PV-6 or Wapiti VII, re-registered G-ACBR (also known as the Houston-Wallace after the patron Lucy, Lady Houston), for an attempt to fly over Mount Everest. Flown by Flt Lt David F. McIntyre and accompanied by a Westland PV-3 the two aircraft became the first to fly over Mount Everest on 3 April 1933. The PV-6 was later designated the Wallace Mk I, bearing serial K3488 which introduced a number of improvements. A total of 68 Wapitis were converted to Wallace Mk I standard.

Whitley

Click the name above to see prints featuring Whitley aircraft.

Manufacturer : Armstrong Whitworth
Production Began : 1937
Retired : 1942
Number Built : 1814

Whitley

The Whitley first entered service with No. 10 Squadron in March 1937, replacing Handley Page Heyford biplanes. By the outbreak of the Second World War, seven squadrons were operational, the majority flying Whitley IIIs or IVs, as the Whitley V had only just been introduced. ] With the Handley Page Hampden and the Vickers Wellington, Whitleys bore the brunt of the early fighting and saw action on the first night of the war, when they dropped propaganda leaflets over Germany.[8] Among the many aircrew who flew the Whitley in operations over Germany, was Leonard Cheshire who spent most of his first three years at war flying them. Unlike the Hampden and Wellington—which met specification B.9/32 for a day bomber—the Whitley was always intended for night operations and escaped the early heavy losses received in daylight raids on German shipping, early in the war. With Hampdens, the Whitley made the first bombing raid on German soil on the night of 19/20 March 1940, attacking the Hornum seaplane base on the Island of Sylt. Whitleys also carried out Operation Haddock the first RAF raid on Italy, on the night of 11/12 June 1940. As the oldest of the three bombers, the Whitley was obsolete by the start of the war, yet over 1,000 more were produced before a suitable replacement was found. A particular problem with the twin-engine aircraft, was that it could not maintain altitude on one engine. Whitleys flew 8,996 operations with RAF Bomber Command, dropped 9,845 tons (8,931 tonnes) of bombs and 269 aircraft were lost in action. From April 1942, the Whitley was retired as first-line bomber. It continued to serve as glider tug, paratroop trainer, transport, or radio countermeasures aircraft. It also played an important role in Coastal Command . No. 100 Group RAF used Whitleys to carry airborne radar and electronic counter-measures. In February 1942, Whitleys carried the paratroops who participated in the Bruneval raid (Operation Biting) in which German radar technology was captured from a German base on the coast of France. The British Overseas Airways Corporation operated 15 Whitley Mk Vs converted into freighters in 1942. Running night supply flights from Gibraltar to Malta, they took seven hours to reach the island, often landing during air attacks. They used large quantities of fuel for a small payload and were replaced in August 1942 by the Lockheed Hudson, with the 14 survivors being returned to the Royal Air Force. Long-range Coastal Command Mk VII variants, were among the last in front-line service, with the first kill attributed to them being the sinking of the German submarine U-751, on 17 July 1942, in combination with a Lancaster heavy bomber.

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