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Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)

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Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)

Brian Fabris Kingcome was born in Calcutta on May 31st 1917. Brian Kingcome was educated at Bedford and in 1936 entered the RAF College, Cranwell. Soon after he began his pilot course he was seriously injured in a car accident and was told by the RAF medical board that he would never fly again as he was expected to suffer permanent double vision. But after months in hospital and with Brians strength of character he proved the board wrong. In 1938 he was posted to No 65, a biplane Gladiator fighter squadron based at Hornchurch. Brian Kingcome took part in the Battles of France and Dunkirk but transferred to 92 Squadron as a flight commander and flying Spitfires in May 1940 scoring his first victories in June 1940. Brian Kingcome became acting commanding officer during the latter stages of the Battle of Britain. During this time he and his pilots achieved the highest success rate of any squadron in the entire Battle of Britain. After being shot down by Me109s and wounded, he returned to active operations. In February 1942 he was posted to command 72 Squadron, followed by promotion to Wing Leader at Kenley. In May 1943 he was posted to lead 244 Wing in the Mediterranean during the invasion of Sicily. An Ace, Brian Kingcome flew Spitfires in combat continually until the end of 1944, his tally finishing at 8 and 3 shared destroyed, plus a score of probables and damaged. One of the prewar Cranwell elite, Brian Kingcome was to become one ofthe Second World Wars great fighter leaders, alongside such immortals as Douglas Bader, Bob Stanford Tuck and Johnnie Johnson. At the outbreak of war he was serving in 65 Squadron, but in May 1940 was posted to 92 Squadron as flight commander. On 25 May he shared a Do 17 and on 2 June destroyed two He l l Is and damaged a third. He shared a Ju 88 with two others on I0 July, and again on the 24th. On 9 September he probably destroyed a Bf 110 and two days later shot down a He 111. On the 14th he damaged another. He shot down a Bf 109 on the 23rd and next day probably destroyed another and damaged a Ju 88. Three days later he shared a Ju 88 again, damaged two others, probably destroyed a Do 17, and damaged one of these also. Around this time he was awarded a DFC for six victories, and on 11 October got a Bf 109 He claimed another next day, and also damaged one. In 1941 he became commanding officer, having frequently led the squadron. It will be noted that he claimed many probables and damaged during the Battle of Britain, and this was due to his view that it was more important to hit as many as possible than to try and confirm victories. On 16 June 1941 lie probably destroyed a Bf 109, and on 24 July shot one down. He was then rested until late in the year, when he was posted to command 72 Squadron, and in February 1942 gave escort cover to the Fleet Air Arm pilot Eugene Esmonde, who won the VC trying to attack German capital ships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and and the cruiser ‘Prinz Eugen’ with Swordfish during the Channel Dash. In atrocious weather Kingcome caught a fleeting glimpse of tbe Scharnhorst - Oh what a beautiful battleboat! he exclaimed, just as a shell made a hole the size of a dustbin lid in his port wing. During 1941 he received a Bar to his DFC, having brought his score to 10. He was promoted to lead the Kenley wing, and on 15 April 1942 damaged a Fw 190. He probably destroyed a Bf 109 on 28 May, and during the year was awarded a DSO, having added another victory to his score. In 1943 he was posted to North Africa to lead 244 Wing, and lead this for 18 months, becoming a Gp. Capt. after the invasion of Italy. By the end of his stay with the wing he had brought his score to 18, and was then posted as SASO of a Liberator group, and flew an operation as a waist gunner over northern Yugoslavia after taking up this appointment. Sadly Group Captain Brian Kingcome passed away aged 76 in 1994.

Awarded the Distinguished Service OrderAwarded the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Service Order
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)

 Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea. ......
Land, Sea and Air by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Price : £260.00
Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea. ......

Quantity:
A solo spitfire flies through the clouds over southern England. ......Give Us Spitfires by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Price : £250.00
A solo spitfire flies through the clouds over southern England. ......

Quantity:
 Spitfires pass above a downed Me110 as they return to base at Biggin Hill in September 1940, the most intense and crucial phase of the Battle of Britain. ......
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Price : £490.00
Spitfires pass above a downed Me110 as they return to base at Biggin Hill in September 1940, the most intense and crucial phase of the Battle of Britain. ......

Quantity:
 Spitfires pass above a downed Me110 as they return to base at Biggin Hill in September 1940, the most intense and crucial phase of the Battle of Britain. ......
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Price : £350.00
Spitfires pass above a downed Me110 as they return to base at Biggin Hill in September 1940, the most intense and crucial phase of the Battle of Britain. ......

Quantity:
 In this classic Robert Taylor painting Brian Kingcome is seen leading the Spitfires of 92 Squadron in a diving attack into a force of HEIIIs over the city of London during the height of the Battle of Britain. Brian Kingcome flew Spitfires operationa......Tally Ho by Robert Taylor
SOLD OUT
In this classic Robert Taylor painting Brian Kingcome is seen leading the Spitfires of 92 Squadron in a diving attack into a force of HEIIIs over the city of London during the height of the Battle of Britain. Brian Kingcome flew Spitfires operationa......NOT
AVAILABLE
 In the calm of a fine summer evening a group of Spitfires returns from the last sortie of the day.  Two small boys and a passing cyclist watch as the leading Spitfire sweeps over the boundary of the temporary airfield. ......Piece of Cake by Michael Turner.
SOLD OUT
In the calm of a fine summer evening a group of Spitfires returns from the last sortie of the day. Two small boys and a passing cyclist watch as the leading Spitfire sweeps over the boundary of the temporary airfield. ......NOT
AVAILABLE
<b>SOLD OUT. ......
Summer Victory by Robert Taylor.
SOLD OUT
SOLD OUT. ......NOT
AVAILABLE

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)



Trudgian RAF Fighter Print Pack.
Pack Price : £1040.00
Saving : £954
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Their Finest Hour by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.
Operation Bodenplatte by Nicolas Trudgian.
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:




Nicolas Trudgian Trade Price Spitfire Pack.
Pack Price : £1550.00
Saving : £1344
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Their Finest Hour by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Victory Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.
Operation Bodenplatte by Nicolas Trudgian.
Head to Head by Nicolas Trudgian
Combat Over Beachy Head by Nicolas Trudgian.
Normandy Fighter Sweep by Nicolas Trudgian.
Victory Over Gold by Nicolas Trudgian.
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:

Pack 717. Pack of two Spitfire prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £585.00
Saving : £454
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Eagle Force by Robert Taylor. (B)
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:

Battle of Britain Aviation Art Prints.
Pack Price : £580.00
Saving : £529
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Hornchurch Scramble by Robert Taylor. (B)
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:

Battle of Britain Spitfire Prints.
Pack Price : £680.00
Saving : £429
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Hornchurch Scramble by Robert Taylor. (B)
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:

Spitfire Battle of Britain Aviation Art.
Pack Price : £540.00
Saving : £474
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson.
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:

Nicolas Trudgian Battle of Britain Print Pack With THREE FREE PRINTS!
Pack Price : £500.00
Saving : £544
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Where Thoroughbreds Play by Ivan Berryman.
High Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:


Special Sale Pack of 5 Prints - 4 FREE!
Pack Price : £420.00
Saving : £470
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
The Struggle for Malta by Ivan Berryman. (F)
LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
Rare Spitfire Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £880.00
Saving : £530
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Their Finest Hour by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Quantity:
Spitfire Aviation Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £460.00
Saving : £410
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.

Quantity:
Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)

Squadrons for : Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

244 Wing

Country : UK

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of 244 Wing
244 Wing

Full profile not yet available.

No.65 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1916
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1992
East India

Vi e tarmis - By force of arms

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.65 Sqn RAF

No.65 Sqn RAF

Flew Mustangs from December 1943.

No.72 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 28th June 1917
Fate : Disbanded 12th November 1981
Basutoland

Swift

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.72 Sqn RAF

No.72 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.92 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st October 1994
East India

Aut pugna aut morere - Either fight or die

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.92 Sqn RAF

No.92 Sqn RAF

92 Squadron was formed in the First World War, as a squadron of the Royal Flying Corps, on 1st September 1917. It flew Pups, Spads and SE5s during the war, becoming an RAF squadron on the formation of the RAF on 1st April 1918, before being disbanded on 7th August 1919. On the outbreak of hostilities of World War Two, 92 Sqn reformed on 10th October 1939, flying Blenheims before converting to Spitfires. It transferred to North Africa, and for some time flew as part of 244 Wing RAF. After the war, the squadron was disbanded on 30th December 1946. On 31st January 1947, the former 91 Squadron was redesignated 92 Squadron, flying the Meteor before re-equipping with the Sabre and then the Hunter. While flying the Hunter in 1960, the squadron was designated as the RAF's aerobatic squadron, with the name Blue Diamonds, a name the squadron carried on after tranferring to the Lightning. The squadron then re-equipped with Phantoms, before being disbanded on 1st July 1991. It was reformed from a rserve squadron on 23rd September 1992, and became No.92 (Reserve) Squadron, flying the Hawk aircraft before being disbanded once more on 1st October 1994.
Aircraft for : Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Group Captain Brian Kingcome DSO DFC (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Gladiator



Click the name above to see prints featuring Gladiator aircraft.

Manufacturer : Gloster
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 746

Gladiator

GLOSTER GLADIATOR: A continuation form the Gloster Gauntlet aircraft the Gloster Gladiator (SS37) becoming designated the F.7/30 was named Gladiator on the 1st July 1935. The first 70 Gladiators had Under wing machine guns (Vickers or Lewis) before the browning became standard The first aircraft arrived at Tangmere airfield on in February 1937 to no. 72 squadron. at the outbreak of world war two a total of 218 Gladiators had been received by the Royal air force with a total of 76 on active service. They served also in the Middle eats and in 1940 when Italy joined the war was nearly the only front line fighter in the middle east. Between 1939 and 1941. the Gloster Gladiator flew in many war zones. flying in France, Greece, Norway, Crete Egypt Malta and Aden. The Aircraft claimed nearly 250 air victories. It stayed in front line duties until 1942, then becoming fighter trainer, and other sundry roles. It continued in these roles until the end of world war two. The Naval equivalent the Sea Gladiator a short service in the Middle east and European waters. A Total of 746 aircraft were built of these 98 were Sea Gladiators.. Performance. speed: 250mph at 17,500 feet, 257 mph at 14,600 Range 430 miles. Armament: Two fixed .3-03 browning machine guns

Liberator

Click the name above to see prints featuring Liberator aircraft.

Manufacturer : Consolidated Aircraft of San Diego, California
Production Began : 1939
Retired : 1968
Number Built : 18188

Liberator

he initial production batch of B-24As was completed in 1941, with many being sold directly to the Royal Air Force. Sent to Britain, where the bomber was dubbed "Liberator," the RAF soon found that they were unsuitable for combat over Europe as they had insufficient defensive armament and lacked self-sealing fuel tanks. Due to the aircraft's heavy payload and long range, the British converted these aircraft for use in maritime patrols. Learning from these issues, Consolidated improved the design and the first major American production model was the B-24C which also included improved Pratt & Whitney engines. In 1940, Consolidated again revised the aircraft and produced the B-24D. The first major variant of the Liberator, the B-24D quickly amassed orders for 2,738 aircraft. Overwhelming Consolidated's production capabilities, the aircraft was also built under license by North American, Douglas, and Ford. The latter built a massive plant at Willow Run, Michigan that, at its peak (August 1944), was producing fourteen aircraft per day. Revised and improved several times throughout World War II, the final variant, the B-24M, ended production on May 31, 1945. he United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) took delivery of its first B-24As in mid-1941. Over the next three years, B-24 squadrons deployed to all theaters of the war: African, European, China-Burma-India, the Anti-submarine Campaign, the Southwest Pacific Theater and the Pacific Theater. In the Pacific, to simplify logistics and to take advantage of its longer range, the B-24 (and its twin, the U.S. Navy PB4Y) was the chosen standard heavy bomber. By mid-1943, the shorter-range B-17 was phased out. The Liberators which had served early in the war in the Pacific continued the efforts from the Philippines, Australia, Espiritu Santo,Guadalcanal, Hawaii, and Midway Island. The Liberator peak overseas deployment was 45.5 bomb groups in June 1944. Additionally, the Liberator equipped a number of independent squadrons in a variety of special combat roles. The cargo versions, C-87 and C-109 tanker, further increased its overseas presence, especially in Asia in support of the XX Bomber Command air offensive against Japan. So vital was the need for long range operations, that at first USAAF used the type as transports. The sole B-24 in Hawaii was destroyed by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. It had been sent to the Central Pacific for a very long range reconnaissance mission that was preempted by the Japanese attack. The first USAAF Liberators to carry out combat missions were 12 repossessed LB-30s deployed to Java with the 11th Bombardment Squadron (7th Bombardment Group) that flew their first combat mission in mid-January. Two were shot up by Japanese fighters, but both managed to land safely. One was written off due to battle damage and the other crash-landed on a beach. US-based B-24s entered combat service in 1942 when on 6 June, four B-24s from Hawaii staging through Midway Island attempted an attack on Wake Island, but were unable to find it. The B-24 came to dominate the heavy bombardment role in the Pacific because compared to the B-17, the B-24 was faster, had longer range, and could carry a ton more bombs. In the European and North Africa Theatres On 12 June 1942, 13 B-24s of the Halverson Project (HALPRO) flying from Egypt attacked the Axis-controlled oil fields and refineries around Ploiești, Romania. Within weeks, the First Provisional Bombardment Group formed from the remnants of the Halverson and China detachments. This unit then was formalized as the 376th Bombardment Group, Heavy and along with the 98th BG formed the nucleus of the IX Bomber Command of the Ninth Air Force, operating from Africa until absorbed into the Twelfth Air Force briefly, and then the Fifteenth Air Force, operating from Italy. The Ninth Air Force moved to England in late 1943. This was a major component of the USSTAF and took a major role in strategic bombing. Fifteen of the 15th AF's 21 bombardment groups flew B-24s 1st August 1943 Operation Tidal Wave: A group of 177 American B-24 Liberator bombers, with 1,726 total crew, departed from Libya to make the first bombing of the oil refineries at Ploieşti, Romania, the major supplier of fuel to Germany. The mission temporarily halted oil production, but 532 airmen and 54 of the planes were lost. After a 40% loss of production, the refineries would be repaired more quickly than projected.[1] Germany's Radio Reconnaissance Service had intercepted and decrypted the Allied messages about the raid and the departure from Libya, and anti-aircraft defenses were in place despite the low-level approach of the bombers.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

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