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Bristol F2B - Aircraft Profile - Bristol : Bristol F2B

Bristol F2B

Manufacturer : Bristol
Number Built :
Production Began :
Retired :
Type :

The Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2 First World war early two-seater pusher biplane and was used by the Royal Flying Corps as a fighter and also as a day or night bomber. The FE2 was one of the few aircraft which gave the allies the edge over the Fokker aircraft of 1914/1915. In May 1915 the F.E.2b entered service with No 6 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps and it was 20 squadron which was the first squadron to be totally equipped with Fe2 aircraft which was deployed in January 1916. The Fe2B remained in day use throughout 1916 and 1917 and in 1918 was used solely as a night bomber. The FE2b equipped 22 squadrons, 16 of which served in France with the other 6 serving the home defence. As the German fighters got better the FE2B was outclassed and was used only as a light night bomber or used on the home defense front against the Zeppelins. Crew: Two Speed: 80 knots (91.5 mph,) Endurance 3 hours Ceiling 11,000 ft Maximum take off weight 3,037 lbs Length: 32 ft 3 in Height: 12 ft 8 in Wingspan 495 ft Engine Beardmore 6 cylinder inline piston engine giving 160 HP

Bristol F2B


Latest Bristol F2B Artwork Releases !
  Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H  Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns.

Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
A German Albatross D-III sees off a Bristol Fighter among the clouds over the Western Front, early in 1917. The D-III was a massive improvement over the monoplanes of the time, possessing greater manoeuvrability, a higher ceiling and synchronized guns. Many German aces thought this the best fighter of the First World War.

One in the Bag by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 At the outbreak of World War 1, AGO Flugzeugwerke GmbH had not endeared itself to the architects of the German war machine due to the flimsiness of some of its designs, coupled with poor workmanship. When the C.1 first appeared in 1915, it attracted little interest and yet went on to prove itself to be a robust and useful aircraft, its pusher design dispensing with the now traditional open framework to support the tail in favour of twin streamlined tailbooms. The observer / gunner in the nose enjoyed an unrivalled field of view, although the engines position immediately behind the pilot was always a concern in the event of a crash. This aircraft, LF181, transferred from the Fliegertrouppe to the navy in 1915 and was based at Nieuwmunster, shown here in an exchange with an FE.2b in the skies over Belgium.

AGO C.1 by Ivan Berryman.

Bristol F2B Artwork Collection



Christmas Hunt - Bristol Fighter F2B by David Pentland.


One in the Bag by Ivan Berryman


Shadow Over London, England, 28th January 1918 by David Pentland.


Deadly Partnership - Captain W E Staton and Lieutenant John R Gordon, Bristol F.2b by Ivan Berryman.


Tribute to the Air Gunners - Royal Aircraft Establishment FE2 by Ivan Berryman.


Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman.


Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.


The Biff Boys by Robert Taylor.


Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman.


AGO C.1 by Ivan Berryman.


Richthofens Flying Circus by Nicolas Trudgian.

Bristol F2 Fighter Aces of World War One.

Top Aces for : Bristol F2B
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
George Henry Hackwill9.00
Reginald Stuart Maxwell9.00
Squadrons for : Bristol F2B
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.101 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 12th July 1917

Mens agitat molem - Mind over matter

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No.101 Sqn RAF

No 101 Squadron was formed on 12th July 1917 and based at South Farnborough. The squadron was commanded by Major The Hon L J E Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, and by the end of July the squadron was sent to France where 101 Squadron was to become the second specialist night-bomber unit in the Royal Flying Corps. 101 Squadron was equipped with the FE2b two-seat pusher bi-plane and on the 20th September 1917 began flying night bombing missions during the Battle of Menin Ridge. 101 1quadron continued night bombing missions during the 3rd Battle of Ypres and the Battle of Cambrai. 101 squadron attacked several German long-range night bomber airfields during February 1918 and these missions were among the first offensive counter air operations and up until the end of the war continued bombing missions. After the First World War 101 squadron were based in Belgium until March 1919 when returning to Britian and disbanded on the 31st December. No.101 squadron reformed on the 21st March 1928 at RAF Bircham Newton and in March 1929 the squadron was issued with the new bomber the Boulton and Paul Sidestrand. The squadron moved to RAF Andover iIn October 1929 where it remained until December 1934 when 101 squadron moved to RAF Bicester and issued with the the improved Boulton Paul Overstrand, which featured the first powered gun turret in RAF aircraft as well as othe rmodifications including more powerful engines. The Boulton Paul Overstrand is displayed on 101 Squadron's official badge. In June 1938 No 101 Squadron re-equipped with Bristol Blenheim and was stationed now at RAF West Raynham in May 1939, as part of No 2 Group, Bomber Command. When World War Two broke out 101 Squadron were stationed at RAF Brize Norton, but returned to West Raynham. It was not until the fall of France when the squadron became operational but suffered a set back when its officer commanding, Wg Cdr J H Hargroves, and his crew were lost on its first bombing mission on 5th July 1940. During the Battle of Britain 101 Squadron Blenhiems carried out bombing missions against the German barges in French ports as well as German airfields in France. Another OC 101 Squadron, Wg Cdr D Addenbrooke, was lost on the 3rd April while taking part in a raid on French ports just 3 days after taking command. 101 Squadron were re-equipped with the Vickers Wellington in April 1940 and were based at RAF Oakington and became part of No 3 Group bomber command. On the 24th July 101 Squadron lost its first Wellington on a raid against Brest. Ten Wellingtons of 101 Squadron took part in the first 1,000 bomber raid on Cologne, but losses began to mount and between July and September the Squadron lost 20 Wellingtons with 86 aircrew killed. In September 101 Squadron moved to RAF Holme-on-Spalding-Moor in Septmber 1942 and became the first operational Avro Lancaster squadron in No 1 Group.Bomber Command. 101 squadron moved to its final wartime base, RAF Ludford Magna on 15th June 1943. 101 Squadrons Lancasters took part in the raids on Hamburg and the raid on the secret German rocket site at Peenemunde. Over the winter of 1943-1944 No.101 squadron took part in the raid on Berlin but suffered high casualties. On the 31st March 1944, during the Nuremberg Raid, 101 Squadron lost 7 Lancasters and crews out of 26 dispatched. In the spring and summer of 1944 101 squadron attacked targets in France in preparation for and support of the allied invasion of Normandy. On D-Day, the squadron used ABC to jam nightfighter controllers to protect the British airborne landings. After D-Day 101 squadron continued raids on German cities with their last bombing mission on Berchtesgarden on 25th April 1945. 101 bomber squadron suffered the highest casualties of any Royal Air Force Squadron during the Second World War, losing 1176 aircrew killed in action. In October 1945, the Squadron moved to RAF Binbrook and later equipped with Avro Lincolns. In May 1952 101 squadorn became the first bomber squadron to receive the first Jet Bomber the English Electric Canberra B2 and in 1954 were stationed in Malaya carrying out bombing misisons against terrorist targets. In October 1956 during the Suez crisis to Malta for Operation MUSKETEER bombing raids against Egypt befroe being disbanded in February 1957 but in 1959 101 squadron was reformed and re equipped with the new Avro Vulcan B1 and the first squadorn to be armed with the British H Bomb, In 1961 101 squadron moved to RAF Waddington. In 1968 the squadron was equipped with the new Vulcan B2 . In 1982,101 Squadron Vulcans took part in Operation CORPORATE, during the Falklands War. A 101 Squadron crew carried out the first and last Operation BLACKBUCK Vulcan conventional bombing raids on Argentinean forces occupying Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands. These 8,000 mile round trip missions required extensive use of Air to Air refuelling. After the Falklands war 101 squadron was equipped with VC10s and supplied fighter aircraft with air to air refuelling during all major conflicts form Bosnia, to Operation Desert Storm and continues today in this role.

No.102 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 9th August 1917
Fate : Disbanded 27th April 1963
Ceylon

Tentate et perficite - Attempt and achieve

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.102 Sqn RAF

No.102 Sqn RAF

No. 102 squadron was formed at Hingham in Norfolk in August 1917 and was equipped with FE2b and FE2ds and operated as a night bomber squadron. 102 squadron went to France and operated behind German lines with their main targets being railway stations, railway lines, and railway trains, specialising in night attacks. In March 1919 after the war had finished, 102 squadron returned to Britain and disbanded on the 3rd of July 1919. On the 1st of October 1935, 102 squadron was reformed at RAF Worthy Down with the role again as a night bomber squadron, initially using Handley Page Heyford aircraft. In October 1938, 102 Squadron became part of the newly formed No.4 group of Bomber Command based at RAF Driffield and was now equipped with the new Armstrong Whitworth Whitley bomber. 102 squadron dropped leaflets in the night from 4th to 5th September 1939 over Germany. The squadron spent six weeks on convoy escort duty under the command of Coastal Command from 1st September until 10th October 1940 flying from Prestwick. 102 Squadron returned to bomber command and soon after Leonard Cheshire won his DSO. On the night of 12th/13th November 1940, Whitley V P5005 found itself slightly off course above the primary target due to problems with the intercom. Changing instead to a secondary target, some railway marshalling yards near Cologne, Pilot Officer Leonard Cheshire suddenly felt his aircraft rocked by a series of violent explosions that caused a severe fire to break out in the fuselage, filling the cockpit with acrid black smoke. As DY-N plunged some 2,000 feet, Cheshire managed to regain control and the fire was eventually extinguished. For bringing his aircraft safely home to 102 Squadrons base after being airborne for eight and half hours, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. 102 Squadron continued for the next thirty-six months to fly night sorties (including the thousand bomber raids) over Germany. In 1944 the squadron attacked rail targets in France in preparation for the invasion. In February 1942 the squadron was adopted by the island of Ceylon, which paid for aircraft for use by the squadron. The squadron transferred to Transport Command on 8th March 1945 and in September 1945 re-equipped with Liberators. The squadrons main role was the return of troops and POWs back from India and it disbanded on the 28th of February 1946. No.102 Squadron used the following aircraft : Fe2b from August 1917 to July 1919. Handley Page Heyford from October 1935 to May 1939 - specifically Mk.II from October 1935 to April 1937 and Mk.III from December 1935 to May 1939. Armstrong Whitworth Whitley from October 1938 to February 1942, specifically Mk.IV from October 1938 to January 1940 and Mk.V from November 1939 to February 1942. Handley Page Halifax from December 1941 to September 1945, specifically Mk.II from December 1941 to May 1944, Mk.III from May 1944 to September 1945 and Mk.VI from July 1945 to September 1945. Consolidated Liberator Mks.VI and VIII from September 1945 February 1946. English Electric Canberra B.2 from October 1954 to August 1956.

No.11 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 14th December 1915

Ociores acrierosque aquilis - Swifter and keener than eagles

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No.11 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.139 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 3rd July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1968
Jamaica

Si placet necamus - We destroy at will

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No.139 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.20 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915

Facta non verba - Deeds not words

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No.20 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.22 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915

Preux et audacieux - Valiant and brave

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No.22 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.25 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 25th September 1915

Feriens Tego - Striking I defend

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No.25 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.6 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 21st January 1914

Oculi exercitus - The eyes of the army

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No.6 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Signatures for : Bristol F2B
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo


Charles A W Watson

Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Charles A W Watson

2005Died : 2005
Charles A W Watson

Born in 1899, Charles Watson joined 11 Squadron on the Western Front in 1918 as an observer / gunner on Bristol F2B fighters, and was the worlds last survivor to be shot down during the First World War. On 9th August 1918, he and his pilot were shot down during an aerial duel near Peronne. With his pilot temporarily blinded by escaping petrol fumes, Charles managed to land the plane in front of French Army lines using the spare joystick and, with the help of the French, managed to get his dazed wounded pilot back to safety.


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