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Colonel Terence Otway DSO LdH (deceased) - Art prints and originals signed by Colonel Terence Otway DSO LdH (deceased)

Terence Otway

Terence Otway
The signature of Colonel Terence Otway DSO LdH (deceased)

23 / 7 / 2006Died : 23 / 7 / 2006

Colonel Terence Otway DSO LdH (deceased)

Terence Otway was born in Cairo, Egypt, on the 15th June 1914. He was commissioned into the Royal Ulster Rifles in 1933, first with the 2nd Battalion, but in 1935 he journeyed to Hong Kong to join the 1st Battalion. In May 1937 he was posted to Hong Kong HQ Cipher Staff, but as a Lieutenant rejoined the 1st Royal Ulster Rifles in August of that year. The Battalion made up part of the international force that was sent to Shanghai to protect it from the Japanese invaders."We spent four months in Shanghai, and we were bombed, shelled and machine-gunned almost every day by the Japanese, whilst guarding the International Settlement. We then moved to India. We'd hardly arrived before we were involved in putting down riots in Rawalpindi. Then we moved up to the North-West frontier and we were there for a year on active service. Not a week passed without us having a scrap with the tribesmen, and some of the scraps were hand-to-hand fighting with knives and swords. So that was so-called peace!" In December 1937 the Battalion was posted to India, and several months later On return from six weeks leave the battalion was posted to Razani, North West Frontier. Otway was appointed Signals Officer. In August 1939, Otway married Stella Whitehead and just over a year later, by which he had returned to England with the Ulsters, their first son, Michael, had been born. In the final days of 1940, Otway was promoted to Major and in June 1941 he attended Staff College, six months later passing out fourth of two hundred. In 1942, he was posted to the War Office as a Staff Officer responsible for briefings and briefing papers for the War Cabinet. In July 1943, he returned to the 1st Royal Ulster Rifles to take command of one of their companies. In his absence, the Battalion had been converted to the airborne role and was now a part of the 6th Airlanding Brigade. In the following month he applied to join the Parachute Regiment and became Second-in-Command of the 9th Parachute Battalion, but in March 1944, Otway was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel and given command. The gallant attack on the Merville battery led by Colonel Otway on D-Day with a much depleted force is one of the legendary episodes of airborne history. Most of the forces and equipment dropped for this operation had been scattered across France including anti-tank guns, mortars and mine detectors. Finding himself with only 150 paratroopers of the 750 planned for the assault on this heavily defended gun battery commanding the invasion beaches, Otway did not hesitate in pressing home his attack. Without heavy weapons the issue came down to bitter hand-to-hand fighting. The defenders yielded and the D-Day beaches were safe - although the guns were less formidable than expected. After the attack only 80 paratroopers remained unwounded. Colonel Otway retired from the army in 1947 taking up a new career in business from which he retired again in 1979. One of his men, Sergeant Les Daniels said of him, "Colonel Otway was a very hard man, very stand-offish, naturally as you'd expect your Commanding Officer to be. No tolerance for a fool whatsoever. You daren't make a mistake with the Colonel." Otway's own philosophy on command was straight-forward, he wrote, "I wanted to be respected and I wanted to be considered to be a fair person, but I wouldn't go out of my way to get popularity. I wanted an efficient, well run, happy Battalion, and I reckon I had it." Sadly Colonel Otway passed away on the 23 July 2006.

Items Signed by Colonel Terence Otway DSO LdH (deceased)

 Official limited edition print of the 60th Anniversary of the Normandy Veterans Association.  The Eastern Flank of the D-Day battlefield, 1300 hours, June 6th 1944.  No single picture could possibly encompass the actions of all British forces on D-D......
Normandy Veterans Association 60th Anniversary Limited Edition Print by Michael Turner.
SOLD OUT
Official limited edition print of the 60th Anniversary of the Normandy Veterans Association. The Eastern Flank of the D-Day battlefield, 1300 hours, June 6th 1944. No single picture could possibly encompass the actions of all British forces on D-D......NOT
AVAILABLE

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Colonel Terence Otway DSO LdH (deceased)

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