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JG5 - Squadron Profile.

JG5

Founded :
Country : Germany
Fate :

Eismeer was a Luftwaffe fighter Wing that served during World War II. As the name Eismeer (Ice Sea) implies, it was created to operate in the far North of Europe, namely Norway, Scandinavia and northern parts of Finland, all nearest the Arctic Ocean. Just over two dozen fighter aircraft that once served with JG 5 during the war still survive in the 21st century, more than from any other combat wing of any of the Axis air forces of World War II.

JG5


Latest JG5 Artwork Releases !
 Messerschmitt Bf.109G-2s of 6./JG 5 sit quietly following a fresh snowfall in March 1943, the aircraft swept down and ready for action, should the call come.  Nearest aircraft is that of August Mors, 'Yellow 7', whilst the mount of Heinrich Ehrler, 'Yellow 12' sits nearby.  Just three months later, on 12th June, Mors was forced to abandon his stricken machine, baling out over enemy territory.  Despite this, he managed to evade capture and was back with his unit only six days later.

Eagle's Rest by Ivan Berryman.
 Viciously maligned for failing to prevent the sinking of the German battleship Tirpitz at Kaafjord on 12th November 1944, Heinrich Ehrler was one of the Luftwaffe's greatest leaders, highly decorated and respected by all who flew with him.  The Bf.109s of 6./JG5, based at Petsamo in Finland, took on a variety of difficult roles in the Scandinavian theatre, operating in the most testing of conditions, often round the clock in the summer months.  Here, Ehrler's own machine, <i>Yellow 12</i> leads other aircraft of 6./JG5 on a patrol above the mighty Norwegian fjords.

Tribute to Oberleutnant Heinrich Ehrler by Ivan Berryman.
Walter Schuck of JG5 returns after a successful sortie.  Schuck finished the war with 206 victories.

Walter Schuck by Brian Bateman. (P)
Cape Malyj-Korabelnye, Russia, 18th August 1943.  While escorting Fw190s to attack Soviet shipping, ObLt. Schuck's flight of Me109G2s from 8./JG5 attacked the four Soviet Hurricanes of 78 IAP/VVS which were on patrol over the boats.  The Soviet formation leader, Mladshiy Leytenant Valeriy Kiritshenko, ordered his men to form a defensive Lufbery circle but this proved inadequate protection against Schucks determined attack.  Breaking into the Ring he first downed Kitshenko, and then pursued and shot down a second Hurricane.

Breaking the Ring by David Pentland.

JG5 Artwork Collection
Click the images below to view the fantastic artwork we have available to purchase!



Walter Schuck by Brian Bateman. (P)


Eismeer Patrol by Anthony Saunders.

Knight's Move by Robert Taylor


Tribute to Oberleutnant Heinrich Ehrler by Ivan Berryman.


Eagle's Rest by Ivan Berryman.


The Frozen North, Petsamo, Finland, January 1943 by David Pentland.


Eagle in the Snow, Petsamo, Finland, January 1943 by David Pentland.


Breaking the Ring by David Pentland.

Aces for : JG5
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Heinrich Ehrler209.00
Theodor Weissenberger209.00
Walter Schuck206.00The signature of Walter Schuck features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Walter Krupinski197.00The signature of Walter Krupinski features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Franz Dorr128.00
Jakob Norz117.00
Rudolf Muller101.00
Heinrich Bartels99.00
Rudolf Linz70.00
Helmut Neumann62.00
Horst Carganico60.00
August Mors60.00
Heinz Arnold40.00
Fritz Stendel39.00
August Luy35.00
Heinz Beyer33.00
Rudolf Glockner32.00
Hermann Segatz31.00
August Lubking28.00
Gunther Scholz22.00
David Wollmann21.00
Rudolf Artner20.00
Erich Gerlitz20.00
Hans Tetzner20.00
Ernst Scheufele18.00The signature of Ernst Scheufele features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Arthur Beth16.00
Heinrich Dreisbach16.00
Hans-Dieter Hartwein16.00
Josef Kunz15.00
Heinz Birk14.00
Werner Gayko13.00
Heinz Halstrick13.00
Erhardt Mecke12.00
Wolfgang Rost12.00
Hans Vollet11.00
Werner Schumacher10.00
Gunther Schwanecke10.00
Arthur Mendl9.00
Heinrich-Friedrich Wiegand9.00
Lorenz Andreson8.00
Karl-Friedrich Schlossstein8.00The signature of Karl-Friedrich Schlossstein features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Erich Beulich7.00
Gunter Eichhorn7.00
Bodo Helms6.00
Rolf von Lilienhoff6.00
Erich Klein5.00
Lutzka5.00
Aircraft for : JG5
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by JG5. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Fw190




Click the name above to see prints featuring Fw190 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Fokke-Wulf
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1945

Fw190

The Focke-Wulf 190 development project began in 1937. Conceived as a hedge against total dependence on the Messerchmitt 109, the 190 was designed by Kurt Tank utilizing a radial engine. This was against generally accepted design criteria in Germany, and many historians believe that the decision to produce a radial engine fighter was largely due to the limited manufacturing capacity for in-line, water-cooled engines which were widely used on all other Luftwaffe aircraft. Despite these concerns, Tanks design was brilliant, and the 190 would become one of the top fighter aircraft of WWII. The first prototype flew in mid-1939. The aircraft had excellent flying characteristics, a wonderful rate of acceleration, and was heavily armed. By late 1940 the new fighter was ordered into production. Nicknamed the butcher bird, by Luftwaffe pilots, early 190s were quite successful in the bomber interceptor role, but at this stage of the war many Allied bombing raids lacked fighter escort. As the war dragged on, Allied bombers were increasingly accompanied by fighters, including the very effective P-51 Mustang. The Allies learned from experience that the 190s performance fell off sharply at altitudes above 20,000 feet. As a result, most Allied bombing missions were shifted to higher altitudes when fighter opposition was likely. Kurt Tank had recognized this shortcoming and began working on a high-altitude version of the 190 utilizing an in-line, water-cooled engine. Utilizing a Jumo 12-cylinder engine rated at 1770-HP, and capable of 2,240-HP for short bursts with its methanol injection system, the 190D, or Long Nose or Dora as it was called, had a top speed of 426-MPH at 22,000 feet. Armament was improved with two fuselage and two wing mounted 20mm cannon. To accommodate the changes in power plants the Dora had a longer, more streamlined fuselage, with 24 inches added to the nose, and an additional 19 inches added aft of the cockpit to compensate for the altered center of gravity. By mid 1944 the Dora began to reach fighter squadrons in quantity. Although the aircraft had all the right attributes to serve admirably in the high altitude interceptor role, it was not generally focused on such missions. Instead many 190Ds were assigned to protect airfields where Me-262 jet fighters were based. This was due to the latter aircrafts extreme vulnerability to Allied attack during takeoff and landing. The 190Ds also played a major role in Operation Bodenplatte, the New Years Day raid in 1945 which destroyed approximately 500 Allied aircraft on the ground. The High Command was impressed with the 190Ds record on this raid, and ordered most future production of the Doras to be equipped as fighter-bombers. In retrospect this was a strategic error, and this capable aircraft was not fully utilized in the role for which it was intended.

Me109




Click the name above to see prints featuring Me109 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Messerschmitt
Production Began : 1937
Retired : 1945
Number Built : 33984

Me109

Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. The Me109 was also supplied to several German allies, including Finland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Slovakia. The Bf109 scored more kills than any other fighter of any country during the war and was built in greater numbers with a total of over 31,000 aircraft being built. The Bf109 was flown by the three top German aces of the war war. Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn with 301 victories and Gunther Rall with 275 kills. Bf109 pilots were credited with the destruction of 100 or more enemy aircraft. Thirteen Luftwaffe Aces scored more than 200 kills. Altogether this group of pilots were credited with a total of nearly 15,000 kills, of which the Messerschmitt Bf109 was credited with over 10,000 of these victories. The Bf109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945. Bf109s remained in foreign service for many years after World War II. The Swiss used their Bf109Gs well into the 1950s. The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf109Gs until March 1954. Romania used its Bf109s until 1955. The Spanish Hispanos flew even longer. Some were still in service in the late 1960s.

Me110


Click the name above to see prints featuring Me110 aircraft.

Manufacturer : Messerschmitt
Production Began : 1938

Me110

The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role.
Signatures for : JG5
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

Unteroffizier Heinz Kern
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Unteroffizier Heinz Kern
Unteroffizier Heinz Kern

Heinz Kern qualififed as a Luftwaffe pilot and was posted to join III./JG5 Eismeer. He flew both the Me109 and Fw190, and saw action in France, Austria, Norway and Finland. Flying with II./JG5 he flew escort missions in the northern Arctic waters to the Tirpitz, and later flew with IV./JG5



Unteroffizier Gunther Kolb
Click the name above to see prints signed by Unteroffizier Gunther Kolb
Unteroffizier Gunther Kolb

Gunther Kolb joined I./JG5 in the autumn of 1944 under the command of Major Weissenberger. A few weeks later, at the end of that year he was posted to join IV./JG5 in norway, where he flew both Me109s and Fw190s on coastal and shipping patrols until the end of the war.




General Walter Krupinski
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of General Walter Krupinski

7 / 10 / 2000Died : 7 / 10 / 2000
7 / 10 / 2000Ace : 197.00 Victories
General Walter Krupinski

Walter Krupinski first saw combat against the RAF on the Western Front. Transferring to the east, he became a Squadron Commander in the legendary JG52. In 1943 his victories reached 150 but, in March 1944 with 177 victories to his name, he was transferred to Germany to command JG11. Flying high altitude Me109s, he chalked up another 12 victories before being wounded. In September 1944 he was promoted Kommandeur of III./JG26 and led them on Operation Bodenplatte before joining Galland's famous JV44. He completed the war with 197 victories in over 1100 missions.

Walter Krupinski, known as Graf Punski or Count Punski in the Jagdwaffe, was a swashbuckling fly-boy with a phenomenal record of 197 aerial victories. Krupinski not only never lost a wingman, but also had the ability to help beginners develop to their full potential. He joined the Luftwaffe in 1939 as a student in the 11th Flying Training Regiment. He first served with the Jagderganzungsgruppe JG52, a combat replacement unit, flying the Me109, in October 1940. By the end of 191, he had earned the Iron Cross 1st class after his seventh victory and was awarded the German Cross in Gold and the Knights Cross one year later after scoring over 52 aerial victories. Krupinski taught the aerial art of closing with the enemy aircraft until it filled the windscreen before firing. It was during this time that the young Erich Hartmann was assigned as Krupinskis wingman. The young and overly enthusiastic Hartmann was seriously struggling in his first attempts at aerial combat, resulting in severe reprimands by the group commander. However, under Krupinskis expert tutelage, Hartmann mastered the art of aerial combat and went on to become the top scoring fighter ace in the world with 352 victories. While still a first lieutenant, Krupinski was selected as Dquadron Commander of 7.JG52 in the spring of 1943. On 5th of July of the same year, he scored victories 80 to 90 - 11 in one day! He later transferred to the Reich Defence in the west with 1./JG5 in the spring of 1944. His units mission was to help halt the Allied strategic bombardment campaign against Germany. Krupinski continued to rack up aerial victories and was awarded Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross after his 177th victory. He was promoted to Captain and became Group Commander of II./JG 11. Later, Krupinski became Group Commander of II./JG 26 Schlageter Group. In March 1945 he joined General Adolf Gallands famed Jagdverband 44 and flew Messerschmitt Me262 jet fighters until the end of the war. After logging a total of 1,100 combat missions, Krupinski was officialy credited with 197 aerial victories. Krupinski was also wounded seven times in aerial combat and received the Verwundetenabzeichen in Gold - the German equivalent of the American Purple Heart. A civilian after the war, Krupinski later joined the new Luftwaffe in 1952 and was promoted to major in 1955. He received jet fighting training from the Royal Air Force and became the first commander of the Jagdbomber Geschwader, Fighter-Bomber Wing - 33. Krupinski flew various jet fighters in the German Air Force, but held dear the last aircraft he flew until his retirement, his beloved F-104G Starfighter. General Krupinski retired as Commander of the German Air Force Tactical Air Command in 1976.

He received the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves. He died 7th October 2000.

Walter Krupinski signing the print - Eagles Over the Steppes - by Graeme Lothian

Walter Krupinski signing the print - JV44 Kette of Swallows - by Graeme Lothian

Walter Krupinski - Knight's Cross.




Oberleutnant Ernst Scheufele
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Oberleutnant Ernst Scheufele

18 / 2 / 2010Died : 18 / 2 / 2010
18 / 2 / 2010Ace : 18.00 Victories
Oberleutnant Ernst Scheufele

Joining the Luftwaffe in October 1940, Ernst Scheufele was posted to Norway in June 1942, to join 4./JG5. There, flying Me109s he carried out a total of 67 escort missions for the German battleships Bismarck and Tirpitz. In October 1943 he joined II./JG5 flying over Arctic waters, in Finland, and on the Russian Front, before transferring to the defence of the Reich in June 1944. On 3 December 1944 he was shot down by an American flak battery near Saxony, wounded and taken prisoner. He had a total of 18 victories. Sadly, Ernst Scheufele died on 18th February 2010.




Hauptmann Karl-Fritz Schlossstein
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Hauptmann Karl-Fritz Schlossstein
18 / 2 / 2010Ace : 8.00 Victories
Hauptmann Karl-Fritz Schlossstein

Karl-Fritz Schlossstein initially flew Me110 heavy destroyers with JG5, when th Group first arrived in Norway in 1942 to provide air cover for the convoys supplying the rapidly increasing German garrison in that country. He commanded 13(Z)/JG5 from the summer of 1942 to June 1943, and then converted to fly Me109s. Later in Norway he flew the Me410 Hornet with ZG76, but finished the war with JG54 Greenhearts flying Fw190s in the Defence of the Reich.




Oberstleutnant Gunther Scholz
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberstleutnant Gunther Scholz
Oberstleutnant Gunther Scholz

After seeing action in the Spanish campaign, Gunther Scholz flew with 7./JG54 in Poland and France, and during the Battle of Britain. Transferring to the Eastern Front he flew with III./JG5 from February 1942, later with Geschwaderstab JG5. In July 1944 he was posted to Norway. Scholz was awarded the Iron Cross I and finished the war with 33 victories.




Oberleutnant Walter Schuck
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Oberleutnant Walter Schuck
18 / 2 / 2010Ace : 206.00 Victories
Oberleutnant Walter Schuck

Initially with JG3, Walter Schuck was posted north to 7./JG5 in April 1942. On 15 June 1944 he chalked up his 100th victory during a day when he shot down 6 aircraft. Two days later he had his most successful day, achieving 12 victories in twenty-four hours, a feat never surpassed in JG5. On 1 August, he assumed command of 10./JG5. Walter Schuck transferred to fly the Me262 as Staffelkapitan of 3./JG7, and achieved 8 further victories flying the new jet. His final tally was 206 air victories. He was awarded the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves.



Oberleutnant Kurt Schulze
Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Oberleutnant Kurt Schulze
Oberleutnant Kurt Schulze

After serving with the Air Signals Corps during the Blitzkrieg through the Low Countries and France, Kurt Schulze then flew as a Me110 Wireless Operator over southern Russia, before returning to the west. Here he flew night missions against England in Do217s with I./KG2. In September 1943 he transferred to train as a fighter pilot, and flew 65 missions in Me109s with III./JG5 on the Arctic Front, scoring three victories. In November 1944 he flew in the ill-fated defence of the German battleship Tirpitz. In March 1945 he commanded I./JG51 in the encircled east German city of Danzig, before returning to Norway in May 1945 to command 16./JG5.


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