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Bristol Beaufighter Aircraft Prints by Ivan Berryman and Frank Wootton.- Ivan Berryman .com
L37.  Strike Wing Attack - Beaufighter by Frank Wootton. <p>Coastal Command Strike Wings by Neil Wheeler<br><br>It was not until ten years ago that the first detailed account appeared recording the achievements and sacrifices of the Beaufighter anti-shipping Strike Wings.  Surprisingly, these important and, as a whole, very successful activites semmed to have been forgotten in the years immediately after the war.  Until 1942 the attack of enemy shipping, particularly that to and from Dutch ports and North German and Scandinavian ports, ahd been carried out in the main by individual attacks by bomber aircraft, at times with considerable losses.  The concept of using a Wing of Beaufighters, with two squadrons to suppress enemy anti-aircraft fire and one with torpedoes to sink the ships in the convoy, gradually developed in 1942.  Unfortunately, the first strike on 20th November 1942 was disastrous, largely through failure to rendezvous with the fighter escort, the casualties were heavy and the results poor.  The Wing was not to operate again until 18th April 1943, and only after a thorough revision of tactics and much training.  That strike, which I led, was an unqualified success ans Strike Wings were, so to speak, born.  They continued with great success until the end of the war.  Initially, the casualties that were suffered were extremely high, particularly in 1943 before the Allies achieved overwhelming air supremacy.  But they continued to be high because most were due to the concentrated anti-aircraft fire from the ships in the convoys.  I understand that the casualties were about the same as Bomber Command.  However, the Strike Wings, as a considerably smaller force in comparison, inflicted far greater losses on the enemy relative to their own. <br><br>Account of the operation on 21st July 1944 - Philip Brett <br><br>This was my second operational flight.  On my first I had had a three foot hole blown in my tailplane, teaching me that shipping strikes were indeed dangerous.  This time I was carrying my first live torpedo and I realised I now had to do in anger what I had done a hundred times in enjoyable practice runs.  I was expected to fly at a height of 150 feet and a speed of 180 knots, keeping straight and level until I was within about half a mile of an enemy ship, with cameras recording what I was actually doing when I made my drop.  To add to my nervousness we were told that the convoy consisted of nine merchantmen guarded by no less than 31 escort vessels.  Fear was forgotten in the concentration needed to fly very low across the North Sea in close squadron formation but it reasserted itself sharply enough immediately the ships appeared.  The convoy was as big as promised.  The anti-flak squadrons, 455 (Australian) 489 (New Zealand) and 404 (Canadian) began their climb.  Our leader, Squadron Leader Robin Burwell, held 144 back, aiming to brings us in to the ships just as the anti-flak aircraft completed their work.  On his order - Attack, Attack - we spread out as briefed, choosing individually the biggest targets we could find and setting our travelling light torpedo sights accordingly.  The other squadrons had caused havoc.  There was smoke everywhere on the sea and in the sky.  Explosions were occurring along the whole length of the convoy.  I came in like a good new boy, doing just what I had been told.  I was aware of a sort of sparkling curtain between me and my target and the pretty tracer curving gracefully towards us, but I was concerned only with speed and height and the need to wait until the ship grew large.  My torpedo gone, I could at last ram open the throttles and take violent evasive action as I climbed through the flak from my target and the surrounding escort vessels into the safer sky beyond.  As we circled the scene of the attack there were still bursts of heavy flak everywhere above the convoy.  Some of the aircraft seemed to be having a second go.  Many of the ships below were enveloped in smoke and steam and several were blazing - Bill Boorer, my navigator, thought our merchantman was one of them.  We set course for our base, Strubby, in Lincolnshire, and landed in the dark, unscathed.  At debriefing everyone told of the severe damage that had been inflicted but no-one could be really sure of who had done what.  The next day I heard that, from my aircraft cameras and all the other evidence, my torpedo had been assessed as a hit. <p><b>Last two prints of this edition available - it is now sold out at the publisher.</b><b><p>Signed by Air Chief Marshal Sir Neil Wheeler GCB, CBE, DSO, DFC, AFC (deceased), <br>Group Captain A K Gatward DSO, DFC, AE, <br>Group Captain R E Paddy Burns CBE, DFC, <br>Wing Commander David L Cartridge DSO, DFC and Flying Officer Philip Brett DFC. <p>Signed limited edition of 850 prints. <p> Image size 17 inches x 24 inches (43cm x 61cm)
B0289. Beaufighter Attack by Ivan Berryman. <p> A pair of Beaufighters attacking Axis shipping in the North Sea.  Without doubt one of the most outstanding and versatile aircraft in the Allied inventory during World War II, the Bristol Beaufighter was to endure a cautious reception by its crews when it first entered service, not least due to difficulties experienced by crews attempting to abandon a stricken aircraft in an emergency. Its performance and hard-hitting potential quickly overcame such doubts, however, and it went on to earn a commendable reputation - and the nickname Whispering Death. <b><p>Signed by Flight Lieutenant Terry Clark<p>Signed limited edition of 35 prints.  <p> Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)

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Bristol Beaufighter Aircraft Prints by Ivan Berryman and Frank Wootton.

PCK1826. Bristol Beaufighter Aircraft Prints by Ivan Berryman and Frank Wootton.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

L37. Strike Wing Attack - Beaufighter by Frank Wootton.

Coastal Command Strike Wings by Neil Wheeler

It was not until ten years ago that the first detailed account appeared recording the achievements and sacrifices of the Beaufighter anti-shipping Strike Wings. Surprisingly, these important and, as a whole, very successful activites semmed to have been forgotten in the years immediately after the war. Until 1942 the attack of enemy shipping, particularly that to and from Dutch ports and North German and Scandinavian ports, ahd been carried out in the main by individual attacks by bomber aircraft, at times with considerable losses. The concept of using a Wing of Beaufighters, with two squadrons to suppress enemy anti-aircraft fire and one with torpedoes to sink the ships in the convoy, gradually developed in 1942. Unfortunately, the first strike on 20th November 1942 was disastrous, largely through failure to rendezvous with the fighter escort, the casualties were heavy and the results poor. The Wing was not to operate again until 18th April 1943, and only after a thorough revision of tactics and much training. That strike, which I led, was an unqualified success ans Strike Wings were, so to speak, born. They continued with great success until the end of the war. Initially, the casualties that were suffered were extremely high, particularly in 1943 before the Allies achieved overwhelming air supremacy. But they continued to be high because most were due to the concentrated anti-aircraft fire from the ships in the convoys. I understand that the casualties were about the same as Bomber Command. However, the Strike Wings, as a considerably smaller force in comparison, inflicted far greater losses on the enemy relative to their own.

Account of the operation on 21st July 1944 - Philip Brett

This was my second operational flight. On my first I had had a three foot hole blown in my tailplane, teaching me that shipping strikes were indeed dangerous. This time I was carrying my first live torpedo and I realised I now had to do in anger what I had done a hundred times in enjoyable practice runs. I was expected to fly at a height of 150 feet and a speed of 180 knots, keeping straight and level until I was within about half a mile of an enemy ship, with cameras recording what I was actually doing when I made my drop. To add to my nervousness we were told that the convoy consisted of nine merchantmen guarded by no less than 31 escort vessels. Fear was forgotten in the concentration needed to fly very low across the North Sea in close squadron formation but it reasserted itself sharply enough immediately the ships appeared. The convoy was as big as promised. The anti-flak squadrons, 455 (Australian) 489 (New Zealand) and 404 (Canadian) began their climb. Our leader, Squadron Leader Robin Burwell, held 144 back, aiming to brings us in to the ships just as the anti-flak aircraft completed their work. On his order - Attack, Attack - we spread out as briefed, choosing individually the biggest targets we could find and setting our travelling light torpedo sights accordingly. The other squadrons had caused havoc. There was smoke everywhere on the sea and in the sky. Explosions were occurring along the whole length of the convoy. I came in like a good new boy, doing just what I had been told. I was aware of a sort of sparkling curtain between me and my target and the pretty tracer curving gracefully towards us, but I was concerned only with speed and height and the need to wait until the ship grew large. My torpedo gone, I could at last ram open the throttles and take violent evasive action as I climbed through the flak from my target and the surrounding escort vessels into the safer sky beyond. As we circled the scene of the attack there were still bursts of heavy flak everywhere above the convoy. Some of the aircraft seemed to be having a second go. Many of the ships below were enveloped in smoke and steam and several were blazing - Bill Boorer, my navigator, thought our merchantman was one of them. We set course for our base, Strubby, in Lincolnshire, and landed in the dark, unscathed. At debriefing everyone told of the severe damage that had been inflicted but no-one could be really sure of who had done what. The next day I heard that, from my aircraft cameras and all the other evidence, my torpedo had been assessed as a hit.

Last two prints of this edition available - it is now sold out at the publisher.

Signed by Air Chief Marshal Sir Neil Wheeler GCB, CBE, DSO, DFC, AFC (deceased),
Group Captain A K Gatward DSO, DFC, AE,
Group Captain R E Paddy Burns CBE, DFC,
Wing Commander David L Cartridge DSO, DFC and Flying Officer Philip Brett DFC.

Signed limited edition of 850 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 24 inches (43cm x 61cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

B0289. Beaufighter Attack by Ivan Berryman.

A pair of Beaufighters attacking Axis shipping in the North Sea. Without doubt one of the most outstanding and versatile aircraft in the Allied inventory during World War II, the Bristol Beaufighter was to endure a cautious reception by its crews when it first entered service, not least due to difficulties experienced by crews attempting to abandon a stricken aircraft in an emergency. Its performance and hard-hitting potential quickly overcame such doubts, however, and it went on to earn a commendable reputation - and the nickname Whispering Death.

Signed by Flight Lieutenant Terry Clark

Signed limited edition of 35 prints.

Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)


Website Price: £ 165.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £305.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £140




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


Air Chief Marshal Sir Neil Wheeler GCB, CBE, DSO, DFC, AFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £35 (matted)

An ex-Cranwell entrant who had graduated in 1937, Wheeler had served in Bomber Command before the war. In 1940 he joined the Photographic Development Unit at Heston pioneering photographic reconnaissance, flying unarmed Spitfires deep into enemy territory. In November 1942 he was just completing his OTU on Beaufighters when the posting arrived to 236 Squadron and the North Coates Wing shortly after its first disastrous strike attack on 28th November 1942. Wheelers review and revision of the tactics involved in Strike Wing attacks, and the intensive training program he introduced, were to prove critical to the success of the whole concept. On 18th April 1943, Wheeler led the North Coates Wing in its first successful attack, on a German convoy off Ijmuiden. Leading the Wing until September 1944, Neil Wheeler went on to hold high command in the post-war RAF. Sadly, Neil Wheeler died on 9th January 2009.
Flying Officer Philip Brett DFC
*Signature Value : £35 (matted)

Joining the RAF in 1942 and gaining his wings in Canada, Philip Brett became operational with No.144 Squadron flying Beaufighters in July 1944. From then until the end of the war he flew anti-flak, torpedo and finally rocket-projectile equipped Beaufighter Xs on 37 operational sorties against enemy shipping along the Dutch and Norwegian coasts. He was awarded the DFC. On his 38th operation on 3rd May 1944 he was shot down en route to Kiel Bay and spent four days in a dinghy before being rescued.


Group Captain A K Gatward DSO, DFC, AE (deceased)
*Signature Value : £35 (matted)

A pre-war RAFVR pilot, Gatward completed his first tour of operations in 1940-41 with 53 Squadron Bomber Command, flying Blenheims. His second tour was to take him into Coastal Command, on Beaufighters, and considerable fame. Gatward and his navigator, Sergeant George Fern, now of 236 Squadron, were selected for a special mission. Shortly before midday on 12th June 1942, they left Thorney Island and set course for Paris where their brief was to beat up the routine daily parade of German occupation troops along the Champs Elysees, dropping two French national flags at the same time. Achieving their objective and strafing the German Maritime HQ in Paris on the way out, they returned home without incident and shortly afterwards Gatward completed his second tour, receiving a DFC for his Paris sortie. In June 1943 he began a third tour as a Flight Commander of the famous No.404 Buffalo Squadron RCAF at Wick, again piloting Beaufighters. Afters 404s CO was lost in action, Gatward took over the Squadron, ending the war with a bar to his DFC and a DSO. He passed away in 1998.
Group Captain R E Paddy Burns CBE, DFC
*Signature Value : £30 (matted)

Paddy Burns is unusual in having been awarded a DFC before the outbreak of the Second World War when flying against dissident Arabs in Palestine in 1936. His early war years were to be mainly taken up with technical appointments but in June 1942 he was appointed Commanding Officer, The Aircraft Torpedo Development Unit at Gosport where he played a key role in developing torpedoes which allowed the Beaufighter to be cleared as a torpedo aircraft. Unofficially known as the Torbeau, this aircraft was employed with great success until the end of hostilities. Taking his technical experience into action, Paddy Burns was posted to North Coates to command No.254 Squadron in January 1944. During this tour he carried out over 40 operational sorties and was awarded a bar to his DFC. After the war he occupied a number of RAF posts including Commandant of the Empire Test Pilot School at Farnborough
Wing Commander David L Cartridge DSO, DFC
*Signature Value : £35 (matted)

A Strike Wing leader who also excelled as a fighter pilot and was credited with destroying eight enemy aircraft. David Cartridges entire operational career was spent on Beaufighters. Joining on a short service commission in 1938, he spent three years as a flying instructor before joining No.248 Squadron Coastal Command in 1941. A variety of operations under the general classification Long Range Fighter Reconnaissance included detachment in support of Operation Pedestal, the convoy which broke the siege of Malta, and brought both a DFC and bar. After a period as a flying instructor he returned to operations in August 1944, leading No.254 Squadron of the North Coates Strike Wing until the end of the war including its very last operation during which four U-boats were sunk.
Signatures on item 2
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo


The signature of Flight Lieutenant Terry Clark

Flight Lieutenant Terry Clark
*Signature Value : £35 (matted)

Terry Clark was born in Croyden on 11th April 1919. Terry Clark joined 615 RAuxAF in March 1938 in Kenley, as an Aircrafthand. Called up in 1939, he joined 615 Squadron, Auxiliary Air force, and flew as a gunner in Hawker Hectors before he qualified as an Air Gunner and also a Radio Observer. He joined No.219 Sqn at Catterick in July 1940 and flew on Beaufighters throughout the Battle of Britain. By September 1940, the conflict had reached its zenith and at night the feared Blitz began in earnest. More radar specialists were needed to deal with the threat so Mr Clark was sent to Beaufighters. He did not receive any training and still wore the AG brevet, but people began to ask why a plane without a gun turret had an air gunner on board, so he was given a badge that said RO. Eventually, in recognition of his new role, Mr Clark was awarded his third flying badge – N for Navigator. His job was to track enemy aircraft and guide the pilot towards the selected contact. It was while flying the Beaufighter that he was awarded the DFM on 8th July 1941 after assisting his pilot to down three aircraft at night. He joined 1455 Flight in 1941, forming at Tangmere with Turbinlite Havocs, then flew the same aircraft with 1451 Flight at Hunsdon, locating enemy aircraft by Radar in the Havoc for accompanying fighters to attack and destroy. Commissioned in May 1942 from Warrant Officer and in May 1943 he was posted to No.488 Sqn RNZAF.

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